The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS

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Macmillan, May 15, 2007 - Health & Fitness - 326 pages
29 Reviews
In 1993, Helen Epstein, a scientist working with a biotechnology company searching for an AIDS vaccine, moved to Uganda, where she witnessed firsthand the suffering caused by the epidemic. Now, in her unsparing and illuminating account of this global disease, she describes how international health experts, governments, and ordinary Africans have struggled to understand the rapid and devastating spread of the disease in Africa, and traces the changes wrought by new medical developments and emerging political realities. It is an account of scientific discovery and intrigue with implications far beyond the fight against one tragic disease.  The AIDS epidemic is partly a consequence of the rapid transition of African societies from an agrarian past to an impoverished present. Millions of African people have yet to find a place in an increasingly globalized world, and their poverty and social dislocation have generated an earthquake in gender relations that deeply affects the spread of HIV. But Epstein argues that there are solutions to this crisis, and some of the most effective ones may be simpler than many people assume.  Written with conviction, knowledge, and insight, Why Don't They Listen? will change how we think about the worst health crisis of the past century, and our strategies for improving global public health.
  

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Review: The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS

User Review  - Wcd - Goodreads

An enlightening read for someone whose understanding of HIV/AIDS is based largely on the epidemic's history in the developed world. Arguing that the causes, and solutions to the spread of HIV/AIDS in ... Read full review

Review: The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS

User Review  - Itsuro - Goodreads

Interesting but for those who spent sometime in Africa, especially worked in development cooperation field, it might sound so common. But sexual behaviors in east and Southern Africa is an eye-opener. And socio-economic analysis is valuable and relevant for effective development aid in Africa. Read full review

Contents

WHAT HAPPENED IN SOUTHERN AFRICA
87
WHAT HAPPENED IN UGANDA AND WASHINGTON AND GENEVA
153
THE FRONT LINES
211
Appendix A Magic Bullet After All?
263
Notes
271
Acknowledgments
311
Index
315
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Helen Epstein writes frequently on public health for various publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine. She is currently a visiting research scholar at the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University.

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