The underground empire: where crime and governments embrace

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Doubleday, Jun 1, 1986 - Political Science - 1165 pages
5 Reviews
Reports on a first-hand investigation of three international criminal networks trafficking in drugs and the elite force charged with bringing them to justice

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Review: The Underground Empire: Where Crime and Governments Embrace

User Review  - Tom Kilobees - Goodreads

'The Underground Empire' is a vast, sprawling masterwork of investigative journalism, filled to the brim with unaltered names, dates, and figures, ultimately serving as a stunning indictment of America's impotent political publicity stunt known as the "War On Drugs" Read full review

Review: The Underground Empire: Where Crime and Governments Embrace

User Review  - Mack - Goodreads

This is a stunning book. Obviously, the "War on Drugs" is a total failure. Read full review

Contents

What does a very ambitious cobra do when you
11
I kick in a door and Ive gotta talk some guy into
53
The head guy asked me if I knew what Centac
115
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1986)

JAMES MILLS is Director of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare, Glasgow, and ESRC Research Fellow/Senior Lecturer in History, University of Strathclyde, UK. His publications include "Madness, Cannabis and Colonialism: The 'native-only' lunatic asylums of British India, 1857-1900" (Basingstoke: Palgrave 2000) and "Cannabis Britannica: Empire, Trade and Prohibition 1800-1928" (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2005). PATRICIA BARTON is a Research Fellow at the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare, University of Strathclyde, UK. Her publications include "The Quacks and Adulterers: Colonial South Asia's Other Drug Problem," (Forthcoming 2008).