Cyclopedia of American horticulture: comprising suggestions for cultivation of horticultural plants, descriptions of the species of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamental plants sold in the United States and Canada, together with geographical and biographical sketches, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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The Macmillan company, 1900 - Gardening
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Page 188 - But it is only within the last few years that it has been possible to realise something of the beauty and significance of this
Page 79 - ... sets very early the crop may be expected to be destroyed unless the most vigilant means are employed of fighting the insect. The best way to dispose of the curculio in apricot orchards is to catch him. Spraying with arsenical poisons is uncertain. The insect must be caught by jarring the trees, in the same manner as on plums and peaches, but the work must be even more thoroughly done than upon those fruits. The jarring should begin as soon as the blossoms fall and continue as long as the insects...
Page 80 - lands. 4. The curculios can be kept in check when they are caught and killed ; and this is best done by jarring them onto sheets, in the same manner long followed in plum and peach orchards. 5. It is not yet certain what are the best stocks for apricots in Western New York. It is probable that no one stock is best under all circumstances. The apricot root itself seems to be impatient of our cold and wet soils, which are drenched by the drainage of winter. It needs a very deep and rich soil, but...
Page 80 - ... same manner as on plums and peaches, but the work must be even more thoroughly done than upon those fruits. The jarring should begin as soon as the blossoms fall and continue as long as the insects are numerous enough to do serious damage. It will usually be necessary to catch the insects for four or six weeks, two or three times a week, or perhaps, even every day. The work must be done early in the morning, while the curculio is indisposed to fly. It is said by some growers that the curculio...
Page 79 - ... the spring frosts are not so serious as elsewhere. Generally a somewhat backward exposure, if it can be obtained, is desirable, in order to retard blooming. Apricots will be sure to fail in frosty localities. The apricot should always be given clean culture. For the first two or three years some hoed crop may be grown between the trees, but after that the trees should be allowed the entire land, particularly if set less than twenty feet apart.
Page 113 - ... purple, rose or deep red ; or beautifully mottled, striped, or edged with those colors, or having a red or blue centre." About fifty years ago the habit of the plant had begun to vary considerably, and the progenitors of our modern dwarf races began to attract attention. The quilled, high centered flower of a generation or more ago is too stiff to satisfy the tastes of these later days, and the many flatrayed, loose and fluffy races are now most in demand, and their popularity is usually greater...
Page 376 - Characterized by the excessive proportion of the corneous endosperm, and the small size of the kernels and ear. The kernel split laterally shows the chit and corneous matter enveloping-, and in some cases a fine, starchy line.
Page 79 - Natural size. leaves ovate and more or less tapering at both ends, thin, dull green, on slender and pubescent mostly glandless stalks, finely appressed-serrate, and hairy on the veins below. Flowers large and plum-like, blush, solitary or in twos, on pubescent...
Page 79 - ... retard blooming. Apricots will be sure to fail in frosty localities. The apricot should always be given clean culture. For the first two or three years some hoed crop may be grown between the trees, but after that they should, in general, be allowed the entire land, particularly if set less than twenty feet apart. Cultivation should be stopped late in summer or early in the fall, in order to allow the wood to mature thoroughly. The trees are pruned in essentially the same way as plums. The question...
Page 79 - ... this difficulty may be expected to disappear as soon as greater attention is given to the fruit and our nurserymen begin to propagate it extensively. Aside from the above difficulties, there are probably no reasons why apricots should not be grown in Western New York as easily as plums or peaches. The apricot is a fruit somewhat intermediate between the peach and the plum. The tree is a round-headed, spreading grower with dark somewhat peach-like bark, and very broad or almost circular leaves....

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