Howards End (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
10 Reviews
"Howards End" is E. M. Forster's classic story of the varying struggles of members of different strata of the English middle class. The story centers around three families; the Wilcoxes, who made their fortune in the American colonies; the Schlegels, three siblings who represent the intellectual bourgeoisie; and the Basts, a young struggling lower middle-class couple. "Howards End", one of Forster's greatest works, is a classic dramatization of the differences in life amongst the English middle class.
  

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Review: Howards End

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

It's been a long time since I had a heroine with whom I identified as strongly as Meg Schlegel: young-ish but headed into spinster territory; interested in art and intellectual pursuits, but also ... Read full review

Review: Howards End

User Review  - Zorena - Goodreads

Beautifully written and what I was expecting when I started this book but it's so much more than that. Bucolic settings pave the way for lessons in Victorian era mores, economics and class. First off ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
II
5
III
8
IV
14
V
18
VI
26
VII
32
VIII
36
XXIV
112
XXV
114
XXVI
119
XXVII
128
XXVIII
132
XXIX
134
XXX
137
XXXI
141

IX
41
X
44
XI
49
XII
57
XIII
60
XIV
64
XV
69
XVI
76
XVII
83
XVIII
87
XIX
92
XX
97
XXI
102
XXII
103
XXIII
107
XXXII
144
XXXIII
146
XXXIV
151
XXXV
156
XXXVI
158
XXXVII
160
XXXVIII
166
XXXIX
170
XL
171
XLI
173
XLII
178
XLIII
181
XLIV
183
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About the author (2004)

Edward Morgan Forster was born on January 1, 1879, in London, England. He never knew his father, who died when Forster was an infant. Forster graduated from King's College, Cambridge, with B.A. degrees in classics (1900) and history (1901), as well as an M.A. (1910). In the mid-1940s he returned to Cambridge as a professor, living quietly there until his death in 1970. Forster was named to the Order of Companions of Honor to the Queen in 1953. Forster's writing was extensively influenced by the traveling he did in the earlier part of his life. After graduating from Cambridge, he lived in both Greece and Italy, and used the latter as the setting for the novels Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905) and A Room with a View (1908). The Longest Journey was published in 1907. Howard's End was modeled on the house he lived in with his mother during his childhood. During World War I, he worked as a Red Cross Volunteer in Alexandria, aiding in the search for missing soldiers; he later wrote about these experiences in the nonfiction works Alexandria: A History and Guide and Pharos and Pharillon. His two journeys to India, in 1912 and 1922, resulted in A Passage to India (1924), which many consider to be Forster's best work; this title earned the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. Forster wrote only six novels, all prior to 1925 (although Maurice was not published until 1971, a year after Forster's death, probably because of its homosexual theme). For much of the rest of his life, he wrote literary criticism (Aspects of the Novel) and nonfiction, including biographies (Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson), histories, political pieces, and radio broadcasts. Howard's End, A Room with a View, and A Passage to India have all been made into successful films.

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