ESSAYS FROM THE LONDON TIMES: A COLLECTION OF PERSONAL AND HISTORICAL SKETCHES (Google eBook)

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Page 251 - The Genius of Poetry must work out its own salvation in a man: It cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation & watchfulness in itself. That which is creative must create itself — In Endymion...
Page 251 - JS is perfectly right in regard to the slipshod Endymion. That it is so is no fault of mine. No ! though it may sound a little paradoxical. It is as good as I had power to make it— by myself.
Page 247 - This may be speaking too presumptuously, and may deserve a punishment ; but no feeling man will be forward to inflict it : he will leave me alone, with the conviction that there is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great object.
Page 35 - Then in sight of the combined fleets of France and Spain, distant about ten miles. " Whereas the eminent services of Emma Hamilton, widow of the Right Honourable Sir William Hamilton, have been of the very greatest service to my king and country, to my knowledge, without ever receiving any reward from either our king or country.
Page 140 - Bedford ; and the circumstance which excited me to activity in their behalf was the seeing some, who by the verdict of juries were declared not guilty ; some, on whom the grand jury did not find such an appearance of guilt as subjected them to trial ; and some whose prosecutors did not appear against them ; after having been confined for months, dragged back to gaol and locked up again till they should pay sundry fees to the gaoler, the clerk of assize, &c. In order to redress this hardship...
Page 37 - I have called two or three of our fresh ships round, and have no doubt of giving them a drubbing." "I hope," said Nelson, "none of our ships have struck ? ' ' Hardy answered, '
Page 261 - I could not guide her in the slightest, and she continued to splash, and plunge, and blow, and make her circular course, carrying me along with her as if I was a fly on her tail. Finding her tail gave me but a poor hold, as the only means of securing my prey, I took out my knife, and cutting two deep parallel incisions...
Page 247 - I mean, will be quite clear to the reader, who must soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the two last, I feel sensible are not of such completion as to warrant their passing the press ; nor should they if I thought a year's castigation would do them any good; — it will not: the foundations are too sandy. It is just that this youngster should die away : a sad thought for me, if...
Page 183 - To Jeffrey as an individual I shall ever be ready to show every kind of individual courtesy; but of Judge Jeffrey of the Edinburgh Review I must ever think and speak as of a bad politician, a worse moralist, and a critic, in matters of taste, equally incompetent and unjust.
Page 248 - The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature imagination of a man is healthy, but there is a space of life between in which the soul is in a ferment, the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted...

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