A Sense of Place: The Life and Work of Forrest Shreve

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University of Arizona Press, 1988 - Biography & Autobiography - 195 pages
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Forrest Shreve (1878-1950) was an internationally known plant ecologist who spent most of his career at the Carnegie Institution's Desert Laboratory in Tucson, Arizona. Shreve's contributions to the study of plant ecology laid the groundwork for modern studies and several of his works came to be regarded as classics by ecologists worldwide. This first full-length study of Shreve's life and work demonstrates that he was more than a desert ecologist. His early work in Maryland and Jamaica gave him a breadth of expertise matched by few of his ecological contemporaries, and his studies of desert plant demography, the physiological ecology of rain-forest plants, and vegetational gradients on southwestern mountain ranges anticipated by decades recent trends in ecology. Tracing Shreve's development from student to scientist, Bowers evokes the rigors and delights of fieldwork in the first half of this century and shows how Shreve's sense of place informed his scientific thought—making him, in his own words, "not an exile from some better place, but a man at home in an environment to which his life can be adjusted without physical or intellectual loss."
  

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Contents

Getting Experience
9
The Limbo of Controversy
24
Tumamocville
42
Point and Counterpoint
56
A Place in the Sun
78
The Finest Trip
84
A Wider Outlook
91
A Splendid Field for Work
100
Understanding Desert Life
110
A Model and a Classic
124
A Bitter Shock
138
Weaving the Threads
149
Notes to the Chapters
155
Bibliography
173
Index
185
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About the author (1988)

Janice Emily Bowers is a botanist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Tucson.

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