Select miscellaneous poems (Google eBook)

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Gall & Inglis, 1874 - English poetry - 448 pages
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Page 202 - God save our gracious Queen, Long live our noble Queen, God save the Queen: Send her victorious, Happy and glorious, Long to reign over us: God save the Queen.
Page 143 - Never give up ! there are chances and changes Helping the hopeful a hundred to one; And through the chaos High Wisdom arranges Ever success — if you'll only hope on: Never give up ! for the wisest is boldest, Knowing that Providence mingles the cup, And of all maxims the best is the oldest, Is the true watchword of Never give up ! Never give up ! though the grape-shot may rattle.
Page 365 - ... hard for a man with a mind, However his heart may forgive, To blot out all perils and dangers behind, And but for the future to live. Then how shall it be ? for at every turn Recollection the spirit will fret, And the ashes of injury smoulder and burn, Though we strive to forgive and forget. Oh, hearken ! my tongue shall the riddle unseal, And mind shall be partner with heart, While thee to thyself I bid conscience reveal, And show thee how evil thou art ; Remember thy follies, thy sins, and...
Page 365 - Count not their sum till the total is told, For thou art unkind and untrue : And if all thy harms are forgotten, forgiven, Now mercy with justice is met, Oh, who would not gladly take lessons of heaven, Nor learn to forgive and forget ? Yes, yes ; let a man, when his enemy weeps, Be quick to receive him, a friend ; For thus on his head in kindness he heaps Hot coals, — to refine and amend ; And hearts that are Christian more eagerly yearn, As a nurse on her innocent pet, Over lips that, once bitter,...
Page 41 - ... men. I am not old : though friends and foes Alike have gone to their graves, And left me alone to my joys or my woes, As a rock in the midst of the waves. I am not old — I cannot be old, Though tottering, wrinkled and gray ; Though my eyes are dim, and my marrow is cold, Call me not old to-day.
Page 32 - A LITTLE more sleep, a little more slumber, A little more folding the hands to sleep...
Page 140 - All for the best, — if a man would but know it Providence wishes us all to be blest ; This is no dream of the pundit. or poet, Heaven is gracious, and — All's for the best ! NATURE'S NOBLEMAN.
Page 142 - NEVER GIVE UP! NEVER give up ! it is wiser and better Always to hope, than once to despair; Fling off the load of Doubt's cankering fetter, And break the dark spell of tyrannical care: Never give up ! or the burden may sink you — Providence kindly has mingled the cup, And in all trials or troubles, bethink you, The watchword of life must be, Never give up...
Page 228 - Ho ! Brother, I'ma Britisher, A chip of heart of oak, That wouldn't warp or swerve or stir From what I thought or spoke, — And you — a blunt and honest man, Straightforward, kind, and true, I tell you, Brother Jonathan, That you're a Briton too. I know your heart, an...
Page 364 - WHEN streams of unkindness, as bitter as gall, Bubble up from the heart to the tongue, And Meekness is writhing in torment and thrall, By the hands of Ingratitude wrung,— In the heat of injustice, unwept and unfair, While the anguish is festering yet, None, none but an angel or God can declare " I now can forgive and forget.

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