Flesh and Machines: How Robots Will Change Us

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Vintage Books, 2003 - Technology & Engineering - 260 pages
6 Reviews
Are we really on the brink of having robots to mop our floors, do our dishes, mow our lawns, and clean our windows? And are researchers that close to creating robots that can think, feel, repair themselves, and even reproduce?

Rodney A. Brooks, director of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory believes we are. In this lucid and accessible book, Brooks vividly depicts the history of robots and explores the ever-changing relationships between humans and their technological brethren, speculating on the growing role that robots will play in our existence. Knowing the moral battle likely to ensue, he posits a clear philosophical argument as to why we should not fear that change. What results is a fascinating book that offers a deeper understanding of who we are and how we can control what we will become.

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Review: Flesh and Machines: How Robots Will Change Us

User Review  - Bill White - Goodreads

A little dated now (2002), but a good read. I especially like the B-52 analogy in the epilogue. The aircraft has not changed that much in outward (bodily) appearance, but internally it is nothing like ... Read full review

Review: Flesh and Machines: How Robots Will Change Us

User Review  - Arash Kamangir - Goodreads

How can such a great scientist miss the social context of technology altogether? Read full review

Contents

Dances with Machines
3
The Quest for an Artificial Creature
12
Planetary Ambassadors
32
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Rodney A. Brooks is Fujitsu Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at MIT and director of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He is also chairman and chief technological officer of iRobot Corporation. He is a founding fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAA) and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The author of several books and a contributor to many journals, he was one of the subjects of Errol Morris's 1997 documentary, Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control. Brooks was born in Australia and now lives in suburban Boston.

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