Housing and Urban Development in the USSR

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SUNY Press, 1984 - Political Science - 354 pages
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The "architects of the Russian Revolution" were indeed architects and town planners insofar as their designs for dwellings and social facilities provided an ideal setting for the new society. Yet, almost seventy years later, the Soviet housing goals are far from realized.

  

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Contents

VIII
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IX
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XXI
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XXIII
351
Copyright

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Page 295 - If the Russian Revolution becomes the signal for a proletarian revolution in the West, so that both complement each other, the present Russian common ownership of land may serve as the starting point for a communist development.
Page 350 - Each man, finally, outside his professional activity, carries on some form of intellectual activity, that is, he is a "philosopher", an artist, a man of taste, he participates in a particular conception of the world, has a conscious line of moral conduct, and therefore contributes to sustain a conception of the world or to modify it, that is, to bring into being new modes of thought.
Page 3 - And even when a society has got upon the right track for the discovery of the natural laws of its movement— and it is the ultimate aim of this work, to lay bare the economic law of motion of modern society— it can neither clear by bold leaps, nor remove by legal enactments, the obstacles offered by the successive phases of its normal development. But it can shorten and lessen the birth-pangs.
Page 1 - Germans, who are devoid of premises, we must begin by stating the first premise of all human existence, and, therefore, of all history, the premise, namely, that men must be in a position to live in order to "make history". But life involves before everything else eating and drinking, a habitation, clothing and many other things. The first historical act is thus the production of the means to satisfy these needs, the production of material life itself.
Page xiii - ... the most reckless and treacherous of all theorists is he who professes to let facts and figures speak for themselves, who keeps in the back-ground the part he has played, perhaps unconsciously, in selecting and grouping them, and in suggesting the argument post hoc ergo propter hoc.
Page 336 - Urbanism as a Way of Life," American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 44 (July 1938); reprinted in Paul K.

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About the author (1984)

Gregory D. Andrusz is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Middlesex Polytechnic of Great Britain.

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