The Sun Also Rises

Front Cover
Scribner, 1954 - Fiction - 251 pages
1816 Reviews
"The Sun Also Rises" was Ernest Hemingway's first big novel, and immediately established Hemingway as one of the great prose stylists, and one of the preeminent writers of his time. It is also the book that encapsulates the angst of the post-World War I generation, known as the Lost Generation. This poignantly beautiful story of a group of American and English expatriates in Paris on an excursion to Pamplona represents a dramatic step forward for Hemingway's evolving style. Featuring Left Bank Paris in the 1920s and brutally realistic descriptions of bullfighting in Spain, the story is about the flamboyant Lady Brett Ashley and the hapless Jake Barnes. In an age of moral bankrupcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illustions, this is the Lost Generation.

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Yes, impeccable and precise prose. - Goodreads
I did not like the style of writing. - Goodreads
Book is very easy to read. - Goodreads
It is boring, lacking plot, and extremely drawn out. - Goodreads
God, what a beautiful piece of artwork this novel is. - Goodreads
Novel prose can't fully redeem a dull story. - Goodreads

Review: The Sun Also Rises

User Review  - Wendle - Goodreads

Hemingway might use simple language, but that doesn't mean what he's trying to get across is done simply. He gives the reader enough information and trusts them to put it all together–he doesn't spell ... Read full review

Review: The Sun Also Rises

User Review  - Sascha Rue - Goodreads

I enjoyed this book, I truly did. I don't mean that as in that it was brilliant or intriguing, because it really wasn't. Hemingway's writing style is dull, very concise. Written almost in an ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
16
Section 3
22
Copyright

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About the author (1954)

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in the family home in Oak Park, Ill., on July 21, 1899. In high school, Hemingway enjoyed working on The Trapeze, his school newspaper, where he wrote his first articles. Upon graduation in the spring of 1917, Hemingway took a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star. After a short stint in the U.S. Army as a volunteer Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy, Hemingway moved to Paris, and it was here that Hemingway began his well-documented career as a novelist. Hemingway's first collection of short stories and vignettes, entitled In Our Time, was published in 1925. His first major novel, The Sun Also Rises, the story of American and English expatriates in Paris and on excursion to Pamplona, immediately established him as one of the great prose stylists and preeminent writers of his time. In this book, Hemingway quotes Gertrude Stein, "You are all a lost generation," thereby labeling himself and other expatriate writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot, and Ford Madox Ford. Other novels written by Hemingway include: A Farewell To Arms, the story, based in part on Hemingway's life, of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse; For Whom the Bell Tolls, the story of an American who fought, loved, and died with the guerrillas in the mountains of Spain; and To Have and Have Not, about an honest man forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West. Non-fiction includes Green Hills of Africa, Hemingway's lyrical journal of a month on safari in East Africa; and A Moveable Feast, his recollections of Paris in the Roaring 20s. In 1954, Hemingway won the Nobel Prize in Literature for his novella, The Old Man and the Sea. A year after being hospitalized for uncontrolled high blood pressure, liver disease, diabetes, and depression, Hemingway committed suicide on July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho.

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