The sun also rises

Front Cover
Scribner, 1954 - Fiction - 251 pages
627 Reviews
The Sun Also Rises was Ernest Hemingway's first big novel, and immediately established Hemingway as one of the great prose stylists, and one of the preeminent writers of his time. It is also the book that encapsulates the angst of the post-World War I generation, known as the Lost Generation. This poignantly beautiful story of a group of American and English expatriates in Paris on an excursion to Pamplona represents a dramatic step forward for Hemingway's evolving style. Featuring Left Bank Paris in the 1920s and brutally realistic descriptions of bullfighting in Spain, the story is about the flamboyant Lady Brett Ashley and the hapless Jake Barnes. In an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illusions, this is the Lost Generation.

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5 stars
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2 stars
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You'll love Hemingway's prose and storytelling ability. - weRead
Found this very hard to read. - weRead
The imagery he uses is amazing, loved it. - weRead
His writing is immaculate. - weRead
I find Hemingway hard to read. - weRead
I liked the characterization here. - weRead

Review: The Sun Also Rises

User Review  - Cherie - Goodreads

A week after finishing this book, I am still thinking about the characters and places in this story. I bumped it up from my original three stars, after I finished to four stars as I finally got around ... Read full review

Review: The Sun Also Rises

User Review  - Jr Bacdayan - Goodreads

I'm sitting here in my balcony right around sunset with a bowl of peanuts in front of me and a mug of iced tea in my hand and I'm suddenly thinking to myself I could be in Spain right now. But oddly ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
16
Section 3
22
Copyright

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About the author (1954)

Ernest Hemingway ranks as the most famous of twentieth-century American writers; like Mark Twain, Hemingway is one of those rare authors most people know about, whether they have read him or not. The difference is that Twain, with his white suit, ubiquitous cigar, and easy wit, survives in the public imagination as a basically, lovable figure, while the deeply imprinted image of Hemingway as rugged and macho has been much less universally admired, for all his fame. Hemingway has been regarded less as a writer dedicated to his craft than as a man of action who happened to be afflicted with genius. When he won the Nobel Prize in 1954, Time magazine reported the news under Heroes rather than Books and went on to describe the author as "a globe-trotting expert on bullfights, booze, women, wars, big game hunting, deep sea fishing, and courage." Hemingway did in fact address all those subjects in his books, and he acquired his expertise through well-reported acts of participation as well as of observation; by going to all the wars of his time, hunting and fishing for great beasts, marrying four times, occasionally getting into fistfights, drinking too much, and becoming, in the end, a worldwide celebrity recognizable for his signature beard and challenging physical pursuits.

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