From A to X: a story in letters

Front Cover
Verso, 2008 - Fiction - 197 pages
23 Reviews
In thedusty, ramshackle town of lives A'ida. Her insurgent lover Xavier has been imprisoned. Resolute, sensuous and tender, A'ida'sletters to the man she loves tell of daily events in the town, and ofits motley collection of inhabitants whose lives flow through hers. Butthe area is under threat, and as a faceless power inexorably encroachesfrom outside, so the smallest details and acts of humanity ' anintimate dance, a shared meal ' assume for A'ida a life-affirmingsignificance, acts of resistance against the forces that mightotherwise extinguish them.From A to X is a powerfulexploration of how humanity affirms itself in struggle: imagining acommunity which, besieged by economic and military imperialism, findstranscendent hope in the pain and fragility, vulnerability and sorrowof daily existence.

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Review: From A to X

User Review  - Debra Albonaimi - Goodreads

This novel and the story is holds are a mystery. At no time in the novel does it give explicit information about the location of the story; however, certain details imply the Near/Middle East. When ... Read full review

Review: From A to X

User Review  - Lisa Nakamura - Goodreads

Catch your breath and savour the beauty and texture of the phrasing - read it again. Berger makes the reader work and think, but it is a labour of love and never feels manipulative or coercive. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
76
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

John Berger was born in London in 1926. He is well known for his novels & stories as well as for his works of nonfiction, including several volumes of art criticism. His first novel, "A Painter of Our Time", was published in 1958, & since then his books have included the novel "G.", which won the Booker Prize in 1972. In 1962 he left Britain permanently, & he now lives in a small village in the French Alps.

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