The Cabells and their kin: A memorial volume of history, biography, and genealogy (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Mifflin & co., 1895 - Reference - 641 pages
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Page vi - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page vi - There be of them, that have left a name behind them, that their praises might be reported. And some there be, which have no memorial; who are perished, as though they had never been; and are become as though they had never been born; and their children after them.
Page 118 - Resolved, That a declaration of rights, asserting and securing from encroachment the great principles of civil and religious liberty, and the unalienable rights of the people, together with amendments to the most ambiguous and exceptionable parts of the said Constitution of government, ought to be laid before Congress and the Convention of the States that shall or may be called for the purpose of amending the said Constitution, for their consideration, previous to the ratification of the Constitution...
Page 204 - Oh Death ! where is thy sting ? Oh Grave ! where is thy victory ? The sting of Death is sin, and the strength of sin is the Law.
Page 513 - All ye that are about him, bemoan him ; and all ye that know his name, say, How is the strong staff broken, and the beautiful rod...
Page 118 - Resolved, That, previous to the ratification of the new Constitution of government recommended by the late federal Convention, a declaration of rights, asserting, and securing from encroachment, the great principles of civil and religious liberty, and the unalienable rights of the people, together with amendments to the most exceptionable parts of the said Constitution of government, ought to be referred by this Convention to the other states in the American confederacy for their consideration,"...
Page 82 - Jefferson in answer to an inquiry observes, " till the beginning of our revolutionary disputes we had but one press ; and that having the whole business of the government, and no competitor for public favor, nothing disagreeable to the governor could find its way into it. We procured Rind to come from Maryland to publish a free paper.
Page 73 - Tis opportune to look back upon old times, and contemplate our forefathers. Great examples grow thin, and to be fetched from the passed world. Simplicity flies away, and iniquity comes at long strides upon us. We have enough to do to make up ourselves from present and passed times, and the whole stage of things scarce serveth for our instruction.
Page 33 - ... and tales which no man reads twice, and only an indiscriminate literary voracity would read once. Time gives even to this mass of rubbish an accidental value ; what was in its life-time mere moss, becomes in the lapse of ages, after being buried in its peat bed, of some value as fuel ; it is capable of yielding both light and heat. And so even the most worthless pieces of the literature of a remote period, contain in them both instruction and amusement.
Page 120 - Corbin, were appointed a Committee to meet a Committee from the Senate in the Conference Chamber, and jointly with them to examine the Ballot boxes, and report to the House on whom the majority of Votes should fall. The Committee then withdrew, and after some time returned into the House and reported, that they had, according...

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