Beyond Good and Evil

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NuVision Publications, LLC, Jan 1, 2007 - Philosophy - 144 pages
259 Reviews
Nietzsche proposes in "Beyond Good and Evil" a system of inquiry and analysis known by the phrase 'history as critique.' This straightforward manner of investigation leads Nietzsche to question all of culture's most venerated conventions: science, religion, politics, decency and linguistic stock. He begins this process by overriding tradition when he says "only that which has no history can be defined." An explanation of virtue, for example, can only be written when the defintion eludes all possible requisites of custom and habit. We cannot properly administer the philosophical aspects of morality except through divine direction, suspicion, or an unexamined dependence on tradition. Because of this, Nietzsche calls to question the foundational premise that it is best for human beings to seek the truth. How do we know that mendacity isn't better? What is truth, anyway? He disputes the intention of the traditional esoteric venture. He unburdens all sources of cultural incontestability and claims to fixed truth which empties them of their value: ..".we modern men, like semi-barbarians...reach 'our' bliss only when we are most in danger." Since we are in a process of perpetual adaptation we cannot be defined by any indigenous quality. Instead of adopting a class consciousness for purposes of easy identification Nietzsche asks that we establish an amplified sense of responsibility to our own luxurious creativity. He declares there is a higher calling: an unassisted life of intense but private joy, anguish, fortitude, perception, and constructive preparation.

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Incredible density of intriguing ideas and insights. - Goodreads
Nietzsche's writing style can be difficult to follow. - Goodreads
First exposure to his writing style - Goodreads
strong writing by a defeated idealist. - Goodreads
His writing is of mind altering substance. - Goodreads

Review: Beyond Good and Evil

User Review  - Beth - Goodreads

Nietzsche's writing style can be difficult to follow. (Hello, page-long sentences...) There were times I laughed at a quick sarcastic comment, but I wanted to strangle him for his misogyny. Some ideas ... Read full review

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User Review  - Hemanth - Goodreads

It is the best one perhaps from which I had been through. Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophy teaches us the chaos in human nature and lies the conviction that the universe is in a constant state of change Read full review

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About the author (2007)

The son of a Lutheran pastor, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was born in 1844 in Roecken, Prussia, and studied classical philology at the Universities of Bonn and Leipzig. While at Leipzig he read the works of Schopenhauer, which greatly impressed him. He also became a disciple of the composer Richard Wagner. At the very early age of 25, Nietzsche was appointed professor at the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 1870, during the Franco-Prussian War, Nietzsche served in the medical corps of the Prussian army. While treating soldiers he contracted diphtheria and dysentery; he was never physically healthy afterward. Nietzsche's first book, The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music (1872), was a radical reinterpretation of Greek art and culture from a Schopenhaurian and Wagnerian standpoint. By 1874 Nietzsche had to retire from his university post for reasons of health. He was diagnosed at this time with a serious nervous disorder. He lived the next 15 years on his small university pension, dividing his time between Italy and Switzerland and writing constantly. He is best known for the works he produced after 1880, especially The Gay Science (1882), Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-85), Beyond Good and Evil (1886), On the Genealogy of Morals (1887), The Antichrist (1888), and Twilight of the Idols (1888). In January 1889, Nietzsche suffered a sudden mental collapse; he lived the last 10 years of his life in a condition of insanity. After his death, his sister published many of his papers under the title The Will to Power. Nietzsche was a radical questioner who often wrote polemically with deliberate obscurity, intending to perplex, shock, and offend his readers. He attacked the entire metaphysical tradition in Western philosophy, especially Christianity and Christian morality, which he thought had reached its final and most decadent form in modern scientific humanism, with its ideals of liberalism and democracy. It has become increasingly clear that his writings are among the deepest and most prescient sources we have for acquiring a philosophical understanding of the roots of 20th-century culture.

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