Science and the Faith: Essays on Apologetic Subjects with an Introduction (Google eBook)

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K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Company, Limited, 1893 - 235 pages
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Page 213 - of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust ? " * " Man is a part of nature," it has been said, " and no artificial definitions can separate him from it. And yet in another sense it is true that man is above
Page 87 - Him to whom a thousand years are as one day, and one day as a thousand years, thus to impress His will once for all on His creation, and provide for all its countless variety by His one original impress, than by special acts of creation to be perpetually modifying what He had previously made.
Page xxxii - things together must be immanent and omnipresent. Against Hume's " Events seem entirely loose and separate," faggots bound in bundles by custom and association, we set the view that— " Nothing in this world is single; All things, by a law Divine, In one another's being mingle.
Page 212 - came from. And what is man ?— " Distinguished link in being's endless chain! Midway from nothing to the Deity ! A beam ethereal sullied and absorpt ! Though sullied and dishonoured, still divine ! Dim miniature of greatness absolute ! An heir of glory ! a frail child of dust! Helpless immortal! insect infinite ! A worm ! a God
Page 170 - Later on he says :—" The mystery of the beginning of all things is insoluble by us ; and I for one must be content to remain an Agnostic. Yet, three years later (1879), in a private letter, he writes :—" In my most extreme fluctuations I have never been an atheist in the sense of denying the existence of God.
Page 168 - There is grandeur in this view of life with its several powers having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one.
Page 204 - They that deny a God destroy man's nobility ; for certainly man is of kin to the beasts by his body ; and if he be not of kin to God by his spirit, he is an ignoble creature.
Page 179 - So from the root Springs lighter the green stalk, from thence the leaves More aery, last the bright consummate flow'r Spirits odorous breathes : flow'rs and their fruit, Man's nourishment, by gradual scale sublimed, To vital spirits aspire, to animal, To intellectual; give both life and sense, Fancy and understanding ; whence the soul Reason receives, and reason is her being, Discursive or intuitive;
Page 179 - last the bright consummate flow'r Spirits odorous breathes : flow'rs and their fruit, Man's nourishment, by gradual scale sublimed, To vital spirits aspire, to animal, To intellectual; give both life and sense, Fancy and understanding ; whence the soul Reason receives, and reason is her being, Discursive or intuitive; discourse Is oftest yours, the latter most is ours, Differing but in degree, of kind the same.
Page 168 - animals are descended from at most only four or five progenitors, and plants from an equal or lesser number." * " All the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth may be descended from some one primordial form.

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