Abandonment to Divine Providence (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2007 - Religion - 404 pages
15 Reviews
French writer JEAN PIERRE DE CAUSSADE (1675-1751) believed that the present moment is holy and that people should abandon themselves to present, a stance that is it stark contrast to the Catholic focus on the future and life after death. For de Caussade, living in the moment meant having a complete trust and faith in God, for God's will defined and guided all things. The practical advice contained in his guidebook for the faithful was originally a series of letters written for the Nuns of the Visitation of Nancy, meant to help them navigate the confusing and difficult work of spiritual enlightenment, and comes together here in two distinct parts, one for the theoretical foundations of abandoning oneself to the present moment and one with practical advice on how to live such a life. Though a departure from the standard Christian perspective, Abandonment to Divine Providence remains a deeply spiritual work with a message that many Christians may find freeing and inspiring.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
5
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: Abandonment to Divine Providence

User Review  - Goodreads

This beautiful, extraordinary and timeless book by an anonymous 14th century author is one of the greatest mystical treatises of any time in any religion. It is to be most warmly recommended to all ... Read full review

Review: Abandonment to Divine Providence

User Review  - Edvard Taylor - Goodreads

This beautiful, extraordinary and timeless book by an anonymous 14th century author is one of the greatest mystical treatises of any time in any religion. It is to be most warmly recommended to all ... Read full review

Contents

On abandonment in the acceptance of duties
167
xxviir To will only what God wills
168
On abandonment m sickness
170
XXXI Conduct in sickness
171
On bearing with oneself
172
On preparation for the Sacraments prayer reading and conduct
173
On conduct during a time passed in the country
174
On life and death Consolations and trials
176

Sanctity made easy
13
CHAPTER II
15
By faith the operation of God is recognised
17
How to discover what is the will of God
19
The revelations of God
20
The action of Jesus Christ in the souls of men
23
The treatment of the divine action
24
The hidden work of divine love
26
Experimental Science
27
God makes known His will through creatures
29
Everything is supernaturalised by the divine action
30
The divine word our model
35
ON THE NATURE AND EXCELLENCE OF THE STATE OF ABANDONMENT
36
Section Page I The life of God in the soul
37
Abandonment a pledge of predestination
38
Abandonment a source of Joy
40
The great merit of pure faith
41
Submission a free gift to God
43
God reigns in a pure heart
47
CHAPTER II
48
The pains and consolations of abandonment
50
The different duties of abandonment
52
God does all for a soul of goodwill
53
The common way for all souls
55
The duty of the present moment the only rule
59
Vlli Great faith is necessary
61
CHAPTER III
62
Unjust judgments
64
Selfcontempt
65
Distrust of self
68
The life of faith
71
Section Page
74
Nature and grace the instruments of God
81
Divine love the principle of all good
87
SPIRITUAL COUNSELS
93
Method of interiocdirection
99
PROVIDENCE
107
Abandonment ameliorates the wearisomeness
113
vii
114
To the Sisters of the Visitation at Nancy 1732
120
On the first works of God in the soul
126
On the general practice of abandonment
127
On the means of acquiring abandonment
128
General direction
129
Useless fears
132
Excellent advice on prayer to souls called to a life of abandonment
133
On prayer The danger of delusion in the prayer of recollection
134
Delusion in prayer
136
On the practice of abandonment in the different states of the soul
137
On the practice of abandonment and the peace of the soul
141
The peace of the soul
142
On the practice of abandonment during con solations
146
On consolations
149
The operations of grace
150
On docility to the interior impressions of the Holy Spirit and peaceful waiting
154
XVIIL On the moderation of desires and fears
155
To aim at simplicity
156
On simplicity
157
On the different attractions of grace
159
On abandonment in the trials to which vocation is subject
161
On the value of good desires
162
The call of God a sign of predestination
163
God only desires what we are able to give
165
On abandonment as to employments and under takings
166
Desire for consolations a mistake
178
ON THE OBSTACLES TO ABANDONMENT Letter v Page I About feelings of vanity and frequent infidelities
180
Of the defect of beginners
184
On interior troubles voluntarily entertained and weakness
185
IV Interior troubles
189
On the love of ones neighbour
195
On attachment too keenly felt
196
Personal attachments
197
On natural activity
198
On excessive fervour of good desires
200
On eagerness to read good books
201
On disinclination to accept the comforts enjoined
203
On attachment to ones own judgment
204
On a difficulty in and a dislike to opening ones mind to a director
206
On discouragement
207
On the fear of being deceived and of appearing singular
208
FOURTH BOOK THE FIRST TRIALS OF SOULS CALLED TO THE STATE OF ABANDONMENT ARIDITIES WEAKNESSES AND WEARINES...
212
On interior vicissitudes
218
HI On abandonment during trials
219
On obscurity and weakness
220
On weakness and distractions
223
On interior rebellion and spiritual poverty
226
On darkness and want of feeling
229
On dryness and distractions during prayer
232
On distractions weariness and impulses
235
On weariness and idleness
237
On weakness remembrance of past sins fatigue and fears
238
On the use of trials and how to act about them
241
tetter Page XIII The use of trials continued
245
The use of trials continued
247
Trials to be endured peacefully
250
Sensitiveness about defects a sign of selflove
254
Confidence in God is the cure of selflove
256
Sacrifice and fidelity are the death of selflove
259
On the uses of trials even if they be punishments
261
On the fruit of trialsprofound peace
262
Things painful to nature are good for the soul
264
FIFTH BOOK FRESH TRIALS SUFFERINGS AND PRIVATIONS Letter Page I On illness and its uses Rules to be observed
267
On sufferings of different kinds
268
On public calamities and disasters
269
On contradictory tastes and characters
270
On the profit to be gained by patient endurance
272
Rules to be followed
275
On annoyances caused by good people
276
How to bear these trials
277
On the deprivation of human assistance
278
On the absence of a director
279
On the usefulness of these afflictions
283
Bitterness mingled with pleasure to detach the soul
286
XVIL On conduct during trials
287
The will of God to be preferred
289
On the happiness of souls that abandon themselves to God in their afflictions
291
SIXTH BOOK ON THE CONTINUATION OF TRIALS AND FEAR OF THE ANGER OF GOD Letter Page I On temptations and the fear of giving ...
293
On the fear of temptations
294
An explanation of the state of a soul in temptation
295
How the fear of displeasing God may be caused
303
On the fear of displeasing God and deceiving others
309
On general confession
315
God alone can remove these trials
322
On past sins
329
To act with solid motives
335
II
343
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2007)

Jean-Pierre de Caussade was born in Toulouse, France, and was ordained a member of the Society of Jesus in 1708. In 1731, he was appointed spiritual director of the Jesuit retreat house in Nancy, where he undertook the spiritual direction of the Nuns of the Visitation. It is the notes of his addresses to the nuns that form this book.Kitty Muggeridge, the wife of author and journalist Malcolm Muggeridge, is well-known as a translator.

Jean Pierre de Caussade (1675-1751) was a French Jesuit priest and writer known for his work Abandonment to Divine Providence (also translated as The Sacrament of the Present Moment) and his posthumously-published letters of instruction to the Nuns of the Visitation at Nancy, where he was spiritual director from 1733-1740, although he continued to write the sisters after leaving Nancy. While he is best known for his work with the sisters, he also spent years as preacher in southern and central France, as a college rector (at Perpignan and at Albi), and as the director of theological students at the Jesuit house in Toulouse. Caussade is remembered for, among other things, his belief that the present moment is a sacrament from God and that self-abandonment to it and its needs is a holy state - a belief which, at first glance, would appear to be heretical relative to Catholic dogma. In fact, because of this fear (especially with the Church's condemnation of the Quietist movement), Caussade's instructions to the sisters were kept unpublished until 1861, and even then they were edited (by fellow Jesuit Henri Ramiere) to protect them from charges of Quietism. A more authoritative version of these notes was published only in 1966. It is clear in his writings that he is aware of the Quietists and that he rejects their perspective. Writers such as Alan Watts have found in Caussade an Occidental, Christian-theological analogue to the Eastern religion of Mahayana Buddhism, particularly Zen Buddhism.

Bibliographic information