The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of April 18, 1906: And Their Effects on Structures and Structural Materials, Issue 324 (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1907 - Building materials - 170 pages
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Page 142 - In fact, San Francisco has violated all underwriting traditions and precedents by not burning up; that it has not done so is largely due to the vigilance of the fire department, which cannot be relied upon indefinitely to stave off the inevitable.
Page 66 - The above features, combined with the almost total lack of sprinklers, and absence of modern protective devices generally, numerous and mutually aggravating conflagration breeders, high winds and comparatively narrow streets, make the probability feature alarmingly severe.
Page 161 - Report of a general committee and of six special committees of the San Francisco association of members of the American Society of Civil Engineers. The effects of the San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906. on engineering constructions: Am.
Page 53 - While two of the five sections into which the congested value district is divided involve only a mild conflagration hazard within their own limits, they are badly exposed by the others in which all elements of the conflagration hazard are present to a marked degree. Not only is the hazard extreme within the congested value district, but it is augmented...
Page 173 - Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers, (7) Topographic Atlas of United States — folios and separate sheets thereof, (8) Geologic Atlas of United States — folios thereof.
Page 173 - The classes numbered 2, 7, and 8 are sold at cost of publication; the others are distributed free. A circular giving complete lists can be had on application. Most of the above publications can be obtained or consulted in the following ways: 1. A limited number are delivered to the Director of the Survey, from whom they can be obtained, free of charge (except classes 2, 7, and 8), on application. 2. A certain number are delivered to Senators and Representatives in Congress for distribution. 3. Other...
Page 17 - The test was one of such violence that only structures of first-class design and materials and honest workmanship could survive. Flimsy and loosely built structures collapsed like houses of cards under the terrific wrenching and shaking, and many of the structures which withstood the earthquake were subjected to a second test in a fire which surpassed all the great conflagrations of recent years. Some of these structures 14 which successfully withstood the first test failed signally under the second,...
Page 52 - ... connected with the network wherever practicable. They advised that the system of distribution be equipped with a sufficient number of gate valves, so located that no single case of accident, breakage, or repair to the pipe system would necessitate the shutting from service of a length of main greater than the side of a single block (a maximum of 500 feet) in important mercantile manufacturing districts, or than two sides of a* single block (a maximum of 800 feet) in other districts. The building...
Page 59 - Portland-cement mortar was used. Where the walls were laid with hard brick, with plenty of headers and in Portland-cement mortar, and were properly tied to the floor and roof members there was little, if any, damage.
Page 4 - ... rupture, and hundreds of earthquakes may thus originate in the same place. A faulting may occur far beneath the surface and be known only through the resulting earthquake; but some of the quake-causing ruptures extend to the surface, and thus become visible. The New Madrid and Charleston earthquakes are examples of those having deep-seated origins; the shocks at Inyo and San Francisco, of those whose causative faults reached the surface of the ground. The San Francisco earthquake had its origin,...

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