Select and remarkable epitaphs on illustrious and other persons, in several parts of Europe, with tr., and accounts of the deceased. [Ed.] by J. Hackett (Google eBook)

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John Hackett (of Balliol coll, Oxford)
1757
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Page 280 - Here rests his head upon the lap of earth A youth, to fortune and to fame unknown: Fair science frown'd not on his humble birth, And melancholy mark'd him for her own. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere...
Page 268 - Content with science in the vale of peace. Calmly he look'd on either life ; and here Saw nothing to regret, or there to fear ; From Nature's temperate feast rose satisfied, Thank'd Heaven that he had liv'd, and that he died.
Page 150 - ... you that read This little story; And know, for whom a tear you shed Death's self is sorry. 'Twas a child that so did thrive In grace and feature As Heaven and Nature seemed to strive Which owned the creature.
Page 182 - WHAT needs my Shakespeare, for his honour'd bones, The labour of an age in piled stones? Or that his hallow'd relics should be hid Under a star-ypointing pyramid? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name? Thou, in our wonder and astonishment, Hast built thyself a livelong monument.
Page 97 - His Prince's nearest joy and grief, He had, yet wanted all relief; The prop and ruin of the state; The people's violent love and hate; «° One in extremes loved and abhorred. Riddles lie here, or in a word — Here lies blood; and let it lie Speechless still and never cry.
Page 274 - Yet softer honours, and less noisy fame, Attend the shade of gentle Buckingham : In whom a race, for courage fam'd and art, Ends in the milder merit of the heart : And, chiefs or sages long to Britain given, Pays the last tribute of a saint to Heaven.
Page 175 - Muses' pride, Patron of arts, and judge of nature, died. The scourge of pride, though sanctified or great, Of fops in learning, and of knaves in state : Yet soft his nature, though severe his lay, His anger moral, and his wisdom gay.
Page 112 - Her speech was the melodious voice of Love, Her song the warbling of the vernal grove ; Her eloquence was sweeter than her song, Soft as her heart, and as her reason strong...
Page 3 - Then take Mat's word for it, the sculptor is paid ; That the figure is fine, pray believe your own eye ; Yet credit but lightly what more may be said, For we flatter ourselves, and teach marble to lie.
Page 33 - Sincere, though prudent; constant, yet resign'd; Honour unchang'd, a principle profest, Fix'd to one side, but moderate to the rest: An honest courtier, yet a patriot too, Just to his prince, and to his country true, Fill'd with the sense of age, the fire of youth, A scorn of wrangling, yet a zeal for truth; A generous faith, from superstition free; A love to peace, and hate of tyranny; Such this man was; who now, from earth remov'd, At length enjoys that liberty he lov'd.

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