The Best Elizabethan Plays ... (Google eBook)

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Ginn, 1895 - English drama - 609 pages
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Page 574 - Of what is't fools make such vain keeping? Sin their conception, their birth weeping, Their life a general mist of error, Their death a hideous storm of terror. Strew your hair with powders sweet, Don clean linen, bathe your feet, And (the foul fiend more to check) A crucifix let bless your neck : 'Tis now full tide 'tween night and day ; End your groan, and come away.
Page 575 - What would it pleasure me to have my throat cut With diamonds ? or to be smothered With cassia? or to be shot to death with pearls ? I know death hath ten thousand several doors For men to take their exits...
Page 148 - For I do mean To have a list of wives and concubines, Equal with Solomon, who had the stone Alike with me ; and I will make me a back With the elixir, that shall be as tough As Hercules, to encounter fifty a night.
Page 15 - I have ever truly cherished my good opinion of other men's worthy labours ; especially of that full and heightened style of Master Chapman ; the laboured and understanding works of Master Jonson ; the no less worthy composures of the both worthily excellent Master Beaumont and Master Fletcher...
Page 150 - Drest with an exquisite, and poignant sauce; For which, I'll say unto my cook, "There's gold, Go forth, and be a knight.
Page 158 - Some do believe hermaphrodeity, That both do act and suffer. But these two Make the rest ductile, malleable, extensive. And even in gold they are ; for we do find Seeds of them by our fire, and gold in them; And can produce the species of each metal More perfect thence, than nature doth in earth.
Page 574 - Twas to bring you By degrees to mortification : Listen. Dirge. Hark, now every thing is still ; The screech-owl, and the whistler shrill, Call upon our dame aloud, And bid her quickly d'on her shroud.
Page 541 - If thou do wish thy lecher may grow old In thy embracements, I would have thee build Such a room for him as our anchorites To holier use inhabit. Let not the sun Shine on him till he's dead- let dogs and monkeys Only converse with him, and such dumb things To whom nature denies use to sound his name; Do not keep a paraquito, lest she learn it; If thou do love him, cut out thine own tongue, Lest it bewray him.
Page 610 - O, this gloomy world ! In what a shadow, or deep pit of darkness, Doth womanish and fearful mankind live ! Let worthy minds ne'er stagger in distrust To suffer death or shame for what is just : Mine is another voyage.
Page 487 - O you heavenly charmers, What things you make of us ! For what we lack We laugh, for what we have are sorry ; still Are children in some kind. Let us be thankful For that which is, and with you leave dispute That are above our question. Let's go off, And bear us like the time.

About the author (1895)

Author and editor William Roscoe Thayer was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 16, 1859. He graduated from Harvard University in 1881 and in 1886. In 1892, he became the editor of the Harvard Graduates' Magazine. He wrote numerous books including The Life and Times of Cavour; The Life and Letters of John Hay; Theodore Roosevelt: An Intimate Biography; Volleys from a Non-Combatant; and The Art of Biography. He died in 1923.

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