Letter to a Clerical Friend on the Accordance of Geological Discovery with Natural and Revealed Religion (Google eBook)

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Josiah Fletcher, 1836 - Geology - 28 pages
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Page 21 - Who hath measured the waters in the hollow of his hand, And meted out heaven with the span, And comprehended the dust of the earth in a measure, And weighed the mountains in scales^ And the hills in a balance?
Page 16 - And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years: And let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth: and it was so.
Page 5 - That the invisible things of God from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and godhead...
Page 21 - Behold, the nations are as a drop of a bucket, and are counted as the small dust of the balance : behold, he taketh up the isles as a very little thing.
Page 11 - The heaven, even the heavens, are the Lord's: but the earth hath he given to the children of men.
Page 21 - Lift up your eyes on high, and behold who hath created these things, that bringeth out their host by number : he calleth them all by names by the greatness of his might, for that he is strong in power ; not one faileth.
Page 18 - Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear.
Page 20 - That, if there is any circumstance thoroughly established in geology, it is that the crust of our globe has been subjected to a great and sudden revolution, the epoch of which cannot be dated much farther back than five or six thousand years...
Page 10 - Through faith we understand, that the worlds were framed, by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear.
Page 20 - Dolomieu, that if there is any circumstance thoroughly established in geology, it is, that the crust of our globe has been subjected to a great and sudden revolution, the epoch of which cannot be dated much farther back than five or six thousand years ago ; that this revolution had buried all the countries which were before inhabited by men and by the other animals that are now best known ; that the same revolution had laid dry the bed of the last ocean which now forms all the countries at present...

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