Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin 1903

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Kessinger Publishing, Mar 1, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages
3 Reviews
Franklin's autobiography, incomplete as it is, has become the classic of ambitious youth-not because it has any great distinction of style, but because it is so evidently the genuine expression of a genuine man; the plain, unvarnished tale of a life whereof no incident could fail to be of the deepest interest as casting a light on its evolution.

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About the author (2003)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

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