NOTICES OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (Google eBook)

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1851
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Page 11 - To discover, procure, and preserve whatever may relate to the natural, civil, literary and ecclesiastical history of the United States in general, and of this State in particular.
Page 119 - Be it remembered, In honor of the Philadelphia Youth, (Then chiefly artificers,) — That, in MDCCXXXI, They cheerfully At the Instance of Benjamin Franklin, One of their Number, Instituted the Philadelphia Library, Which, though small at first, Is become highly valuable, and extensively useful, And which the Walls of this Edifice Are now destined to contain and preserve ; The first Stone of whose Foundation Was here placed The 31st of August, MDCCLXXXIX.
Page 117 - upon motion, ordered that the librarian furnish the gentlemen who are to meet in congress in this city, with such books as they may have occasion for during their sitting, taking a receipt for them.
Page 52 - I had no professor or teacher to guide me ; but I had two noble places of study. One was yonder beautiful edifice, now so frequented and so useful as a public library, then so deserted that I spent day after day and sometimes week after week amidst its dusty volumes, without interruption from a single visitor.
Page 189 - College libraries, (exclusive of students' libraries.) — Our colleges are mostly eleemosynary institutions. Their libraries are frequently the chance aggregations of the gifts of charity ; too many of them discarded, as well nigh worthless, from the shelves of the donors. This is not true of all our college libraries ; for among them are some very important collections, chosen with care and competent learning, purchased with economy, and guarded with prudence, — though ever available to those...
Page 56 - In 1806 the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by the spontaneous vote of the University of Glasgow; and in 1808 he was elected a member of the National Institute of France.
Page 51 - To the influence of this distinguished man in the circle in which I was brought up, I may owe in part the indignation which I feel towards every invasion of human rights. In my earliest years, I regarded no human being with equal reverence.
Page 158 - Howard, at a large expense to the State. "These are comprised in 22 volumes folio. Fifteen are from the records of the Board of Trade, six from the State Paper office, and. one from the King's Library; forming a body of historical information full of the most interesting statements, letters, and reports relating to the colonial period of Georgia.
Page 27 - Canandaigua, New York. Lord Brougham remarks, that " although the remote origin of these institutions may be traced to Franklin, Mr. Wood has the merit of establishing them on their present plan, and adapting them peculiarly to the instruction of mechanics and apprentices. He founded the first in Boston, in 1820.
Page 77 - ... it, at the election of the Library Committee. For any injury not amounting to destruction to any book, map, chart, engraving, medal or other article as aforesaid, the person causing the same shall pay a sum sufficient to compensate for such injury. This rule shall be of general application. 9.

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