A Literature of Their Own: British Women Novelists from Brontė to Lessing

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 347 pages
7 Reviews

When first published in 1977, A Literature of Their Own quickly set the stage for the creative explosion of feminist literary studies that transformed the field in the 1980s. Launching a major new area for literary investigation, the book uncovered the long but neglected tradition of women writers in England. A classic of feminist criticism, its impact continues to be felt today.

This revised and expanded edition contains a new introductory chapter surveying the book's reception and a new postscript chapter celebrating the legacy of feminism and feminist criticism in the efflorescence of contemporary British fiction by women.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bjmitch - LibraryThing

During a heat wave you would think I'd be reading something light and "beachy" but no, I've been reading this serious critical look at British women novelists from Bronte to Lessing from a feminist ... Read full review

Review: A Literature Of Their Own: British Women Novelists From Brontė To Lessing

User Review  - Eleanor - Goodreads

Really solid examination of women's writing (even though that is kind of a cringe category) from Charlotte Bronte to Doris Lessing. It's a classic of literary criticism, especially feminist criticism ... Read full review

About the author (1999)

In 1977, Showalter published A Literature of Their Own: British Women Novelists from Bronte to Lessing. It was one of the most influential works in feminist criticism, as it sought to establish a distinctive tradition for women writers. In later essays, Showalter helped to develop a clearly articulated feminist theory with two major branches: the special study of works by women and the study of all literature from a feminist perspective. In all of her recent writing, Showalter has sought to illuminate a "cultural model of female writing," distinguishable from male models and theories. Her role as editor bringing together key contemporary feminist criticism has been extremely influential on modern literary study.

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