The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 224 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1868 - English essays
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 538 - this man's art, and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least ; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee,—and then my state From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate ; For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings, That then I scorn to change my state with kings.
Page 537 - When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd,
Page 199 - pyramid ? Dear son of Memory, great heir of Fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a live-long monument, . . . And so sepulcher'd, in such pomp dost lie, That kings for such a tomb would wish to die.
Page 199 - for his honourM bones, The labour of an age in piled stones ? Or that his hallow'd reliques should be hid Under a star y-pointing pyramid ? Dear son of Memory, great heir of Fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a live-long monument, . . . And so
Page 201 - a pure, beautiful youth, and, in answer to some burst of witty ribaldry, casting among the company that grand theory of his, " that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things ought himself to
Page 545 - My love is as a fever, longing still For that which longer nurseth the disease ; Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill, The uncertain sickly appetite to please. My reason, the physician to my love, Hath left me, and I, desperate now, approve Angry that his prescriptions are not kept, Desire is death,
Page 212 - our infancy Doth heaven with all its splendours lie ; Daily with souls that cringe and plot We Sinais climb and know it not ; Over our manhood bend the skies ; Against our fallen and traitor lives The great winds utter prophecies ; With our faint hearts the mountain strives ; Its arms outstretched, the
Page 211 - Tis time this heart should be unmoved, Since others it has ceased to move ; Yet though I cannot be beloved, Still let me love ! My days are in the yellow leaf : The flower, the fruits of love are gone ;— The worm, the canker, and the grief, Are mine alone.
Page 541 - do forgive thy robbery, gentle thief, Although thou steal thee all my poverty ; And yet, love knows, it is a greater grief To bear love's wrong, than hate's known injury. Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows, Kill me with spites ; yet we must not be foes.
Page 401 - O, THAT I were an orange tree, That busy plant, Then should I ever laden be, And never want Some fruit for Him that dresseth me. But we are still too young or old : The man is gone Before we do our wares unfold : So we freeze on, Until the grave increase our cold.

Bibliographic information