The stage coach: or, The road of life (Google eBook)

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Henry Colburn, 1843 - Fiction
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Page 276 - ... consulted by every person who wishes to be well acquainted with the history of our literature and our manners. The account which she gives of the king's illness will, we think, be more valued by the historians of a future age than any equal portions of Pepys' or Evelyn's Diaries." Edinburgh Review. " This publication will take its place in the libraries beside Walpole and Boswell.
Page 263 - I ever looked on Lord Keppel as one of the greatest and best men of his age ; and I loved, and cultivated him accordingly. He was much in my heart, and I believe I was in his to the very last beat.
Page 266 - NARRATIVE OF THE TEN YEARS' VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY ROUND THE WORLD, OF HMS ADVENTURE AND BEAGLE, UNDER THE COMMAND OF CAPTAINS KING AND FITZROY.
Page 276 - Miss Burney's Diary, sparkling with wit, teeming with lively anecdote, and delectable gossip, and full of sound and discreet views of persons and things, will be perused with interest by all classes of readers.
Page 172 - Too close to shun saluting, But soon the rival sisters flew From kissing to disputing. " Away," says How-d'-ye-do ; " your mien Appals my cheerful nature, No name so sad as yours is seen In sorrow's nomenclature.
Page 276 - Madame D'Arblay lived to be a classic. Time set on her fame, before she went hence, that seal which is seldom set except on the fame of the departed. All those whom we have been accustomed to revere as intellectual patriarchs seemed children when compared with her; for Burke had sat up all night to read her writings, and Johnson had pronounced her superior to Fielding, when Rogers was still a schoolboy, and Southey still in petticoats.
Page 276 - D'Arblay became eloquent. It is, for the most part, written in her earliest and best manner; in true woman's English, clear, natural, and lively. The two works are lying side by side before us, and we never turn from the Memoirs to the Diary without a sense of relief.
Page 172 - Whene'er I give one sunshine hour, Your cloud comes o'er to shade it : Where'er I plant one bosom flower, Your mildew drops to fade it. Ere How-d'-ye-do has tuned each tongue To Hope's delightful measure, Good-bye in Friendship's ear has rung The knell of parting pleasure ! " From sorrows past my chemic skill Draws smiles of consolation, Whilst you from present joys distil The tears of separation.
Page 263 - Vols. small 8vo., price 21s. bound. ** One of the most interesting and 'amusing works that has ever issued from the press.
Page 261 - This interesting and well-written work, in which the severe truth of history takes almost the wildness of romance, will constitute a valuable addition to our biographical literature.

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