A Perambulation of the Antient and Royal Forest of Dartmoor and the Venville Precincts: Or a Topographical Survey of Their Antiquities and Scenery (Google eBook)

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J.G. Commin, 1896 - Dartmoor (England) - 516 pages
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Page 107 - ... continuo in silvis magna vi flexa domatur in burim et curvi formam accipit ulmus aratri. 170 huic ab stirpe pedes temo protentus in octo, binae aures, duplici aptantur dentalia dorso. caeditur et tilia ante iugo levis altaque fagus stivaque, quae currus a tergo torqueat imos, et suspensa focis explorat robora fumus.
Page 87 - One thousand shall flee at the rebuke of one; at the rebuke of five shall ye flee: till ye be left as a beacon upon the top of a mountain, and as an ensign on an hill.
Page 116 - Glitt'ring lances are the loom, Where the dusky warp we strain, Weaving many a soldier's doom, Orkney's woe and Randver's bane. See the grisly texture grow! ('Tis of human entrails made) And the weights, that play below, Each a gasping warrior's head.
Page 474 - Our life is but a winter's day ; Some only breakfast, and away : Others to dinner stay, and are full fed, The oldest man but sups, and goes to bed. Large is his debt who lingers out the day : Who goes the soonest has the least to pay.
Page 105 - tis an inference plain, That Marriage is just like a Devonshire lane. " But thinks I, too, these banks within which we are pent, With bud, blossom, and berry are richly besprent ; And the conjugal fence which forbids us to roam, Looks lovely when deck'd with the comforts of home.
Page 425 - I oft have heard of Lydford law, How in the morn they hang and draw, And sit in judgment after.
Page 277 - Thus every good his native wilds impart Imprints the patriot passion on his heart ; And e'en those ills that round his mansion rise Enhance the bliss his scanty fund supplies. Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms ; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent and the whirlwind's roar But bind him to his native mountains more.
Page 49 - This heap be witness, and this pillar be witness, that I will not pass over this heap to thee, and that thou shalt not pass over this heap and this pillar unto me, for harm.
Page 168 - Let school-taught pride dissemble all it can, These little things are great to little man ; And wiser he whose sympathetic mind Exults in all the good of all mankind.
Page 18 - ... a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills; a land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and...

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