American Journal of Education, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
William Russell
Wait, Greene, and Company, 1829 - Education
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 139 - ... as if there were sought in knowledge a couch, whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit ; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state, for a proud mind to raise itself upon ; or a fort or commanding ground, for strife and contention ; or a shop for profit or sale ; and not a rich storehouse, for the glory of the Creator, and the relief of man's estate.
Page 138 - ... their wits being shut up in the colls of a few authors, chiefly Aristotle their dictator, as their persons were shut up in the cells of monasteries and colleges,) and knowing little history, either of nature or time, did, out of no great quantity of matter, and infinite agitation of wit, spin out unto us those laborious webs of learning, which are extant in their books.
Page 137 - ... as far as a man can judge of his own work, not much better than that noise or sound which musicians make while they are tuning their instruments ; which is nothing pleasant to hear, but yet is a cause why the music is sweeter afterwards. So have I been content to tune the instruments of the muses, that they may play that have better hands.
Page 140 - Neither can any man marvel at the play of puppets, that goeth behind the curtain and adviseth well of the motion. And for magnitude, as Alexander the Great after that he was used to great armies and the great conquests of the spacious provinces in Asia, when he received letters out of Greece of some fights and services there, which were commonly for a passage or a fort or some walled town at the most, he said, ' It seemed to him that he was advertised of the battles of the frogs and the mice, that...
Page 137 - And surely, when I set before me the condition of these times, in which learning hath made her third visitation or circuit, in all the qualities thereof; as the excellency and vivacity of the wits of this age ; the noble helps and lights which we have by the travails of ancient writers ; the art of printing, which communicateth books to men of all fortunes ; the openness of the world by navigation, which hath disclosed multitudes of experiments, and a mass of natural history...
Page 441 - Before closing these notes, it may not be out of place to make a few remarks on the system of working and the prices for cutting coal, etc., in this coal-field.
Page 208 - So if any man think philosophy and universality to be idle studies, he doth not consider that all professions are from thence served and supplied. And this I take to be a great cause that hath hindered the progression of learning, because these fundamental knowledges have been studied but in passage.
Page 137 - I cannot but be raised to this persuasion that this third period of time will far surpass that of the Grecian and Roman learning : only if men will know their own strength, and their own weakness both ; and take, one from the other, light of invention, and...
Page 210 - Another error, of a diverse nature from all the former, is the overearly and peremptory reduction of knowledge into arts and methods; from which time commonly sciences receive small or no augmentation. But as young men, when they knit and shape perfectly, do seldom grow to a further stature; so knowledge, while it is in aphorisms and observations, it is in growth; but when it once is comprehended in exact methods, it may perchance be further polished and illustrated, and accommodated for use and...
Page 137 - I have passed through, this writing seemeth to me, si nunquam fallit imago,1 (as far as a man can judge of his own work,) not much better than that noise or sound which musicians make while they are tuning their instruments : which is nothing pleasant to hear, but yet is a cause why the music is sweeter afterwards...

Bibliographic information