The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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C. and J. Rivington, 1815 - Great Britain
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Page 259 - which holds the moral elements of the world together was no protection. He became at length so confident of his force, so collected in his might, that he made no secret whatsoever of his dreadful resolution. Having terminated his disputes with every enemy, and every rival, who buried their mutual animosities in their common detestation against the creditors of the nabob of Arcot, he
Page 22 - look at this very remote object through a false and cloudy medium. My second condition, necessary to justify me in touching the charter, is, Whether the company's abuse of their trust, with regard to this great object, be an abuse of great atrocity. I shall beg your permission to consider their conduct in two
Page 128 - never seen. This is the road that all heroes have trod before him. He is traduced and abused for his supposed motives. He will remember, that obloquy is a necessary ingredient in the composition of all true glory: he will remember, that it was not only in the Roman customs, but it is in the nature and constitution of things, that calumny and
Page 263 - right hand have proceeded in their estimate of the revenues of the Carnatick, when they were providing not supply for the establishments of its protection, but rewards for the authors of its ruin. Every day you are fatigued and disgusted with this cant, " the Carnatick is a country that will " soon recover, and become instantly as prosper
Page 17 - made as visible to me as the light of the sun, before I should strike off an atom of their charter. A right honourable gentleman * has said, and said I think but once, and that very slightly (whatever his original demand for a plan might seem to require) that
Page 130 - was said of the predecessor of the only person to whose eloquence it does not wrong that of the mover of this bill to be compared. But the Ganges and the Indus are the patrimony of the fame of my honourable friend,, and not of Cicero. I confess, I anticipate with joy the reward of those, whose
Page 257 - country*. In proportion to these treasons and violences, which ruined the people, the fund of the nabob's debt grew and flourished. Among the victims to this magnificent plan of universal plunder, worthy of the heroick avarice of the projectors, you have all heard (and he has *
Page 313 - ill-got riches. These abuses, full of their own wild native vigour, will grow and flourish under mere neglect . But where the supreme authority, not content with winking at the rapacity of its inferiour instruments, is so shameless and corrupt asopenly to give bounties and premiums for disobedience to its laws; when it will not trust to
Page 51 - and to insult the authority of the sircar, " Without any attempt made to suppress them ; " and the company's debt, instead of being dis" charged by the assignments and extraordinary " sources of money provided for that purpose, is " likely to exceed even the amount at which it stood " at the time in which the arrangement
Page 257 - the nabob of Arcot; they fell upon, and totally destroyed the oldest ally of the company, the king of Tanjore, and plundered the country to the amount of near five millions sterling; one after another, in the nabob's name, but with English force, they brought into a miserable servitude all the princes, and great independent nobility of a

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