A treatise on corns, bunions (Google eBook)

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Page 88 - ... direction. Persons, when they first feel pain in the sides of the toe, are apt to regard it as caused by the nail having been allowed to grow to too great a length, and accordingly commence cutting it, thence deriving temporary relief. In consequence of the pressure of the shoe, which is still continued, the flap is forced more against the remaining rough edge in walking than before, and there is consequently more pain and uneasiness experienced, but lower down, nearer the root. The flap thickens,...
Page 95 - This is easily remedied by carefully separating the skin from the nail by a blunt, half-round instrument. Many persons are in the habit of continually cutting this pellicle, in consequence of which it becomes exceedingly irregular, and often injurious to the growth of the nail. They also frequently pick under the nails with a pin, penknife, or the point of sharp scissors, with the intention of keeping them clean, by doing which they often loosen them, and occasion considerable injury. The nails should...
Page 95 - ... they often loosen them, and occasion considerable injury. The nails should be cleansed with a brush not too hard, and the semicircular skin should not be cut away, but only loosened, without touching the quick, the fingers being afterwards dipped in tepid water, and the skin pushed back with a towel. This method, which should be practised daily, will keep the nails of a proper shape, prevent agnails, and the pellicle from thickening or becoming rugged. When the nails are naturally rugged or ill-formed,...
Page 26 - Durlacher,) a gentleman who has had a considerable experience in the treatment of corns and bunions. He says, "Pressure and friction are unquestionably the predisposing causes of corns, although, in some instances, they are erroneously supposed to be hereditary. Improperly made shoes invariably produce pressure upon the integuments of the toes and prominent parts of the feet, to which is opposed a corresponding resistance from the bone immediately beneath, in consequence of which the vessels of the...
Page 94 - ... nail so tense, as to cause it to crack and separate into what are called agnails. This is easily remedied by carefully separating the skin from the nail by a blunt, half-round instrument. Many persons are in the habit of continually cutting this pellicle, in consequence of which it becomes exceedingly irregular, and often injurious to the growth of the nail. They also frequently pick under the nails with a pin, penknife, or the point of sharp scissors, with the intention of keeping them clean,...
Page 63 - The word bunion should be restricted to an enlargement over the first joint of the great or little toe, produced by pressure or by some other cause effecting a change in the position of the joint The...
Page 49 - ... depended upon, as it appears to defy all medical treatment." P. 49. "Another form of neuralgic affection occasionally attacks the plantar nerve on. the sole of the foot, between the third and fourth metatarsal bones, but nearest to the third, and close to the articulation with the phalanx. The spot where the pain is experienced can at all times be exactly covered by the finger. The pain, which cannot be produced by the mere pressure of the finger, becomes very severe whilst walking, or whenever...
Page 34 - ... the injury was inflicted, as the corn is slow in its growth. When fully developed, a black or deep red spot is clearly visible through the nail, and is the seat of severe pain. As this corn increases in size it gradually loosens the nail, which is easily removed as far as the seat of the disease. " Another form of corn is produced inside the inner fleshy flap of the great toe, extending in many cases under the edge of the nail. It is caused by the nail having been improperly cut, or by the first...
Page 93 - According to European fashion, they should be of an oval figure, transparent, without specks or ridges of any kind ; the semilunar fold, or white...
Page 92 - Cooper, and •consists in passing one limb of a strong pair of scissors under the nail, slitting it up to the root, and then pulling out the piece when detached with forceps.

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