Rakkety Tam: A Novel of Redwall (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Aug 30, 2005 - Fiction - 384 pages
100 Reviews
More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA.
  

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Review: Rakkety Tam (Redwall #17)

User Review  - Elizabeth - Goodreads

This is definitely the most indulgent of the Redwall books. You can tell that Jacques wrote it because he wanted a protagonist with a Scottish accent. And this indulgent feel makes the book tons of ... Read full review

Review: Rakkety Tam (Redwall #17)

User Review  - Calliope37 - Goodreads

XD I was reading a different book (Icefire) and another character had the name 'Tam' (Tam Farrel) and I kept on calling him 'Racketty Tam' in my head. Ah, memories. Read full review

Contents

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
BOOK TWOThe warrior who gaineda sword
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18
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20
BOOK THREEThe Walking Stone
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40
Epilogue
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England on June 15, 1939. After he finished St. John's School at the age of fifteen, he became a merchant seaman and travelled to numerous ports including New York, Valparaiso, San Francisco, and Yokohama. Tiring of the lonely life of a sailor, he returned to Liverpool where he worked as a railway fireman, a longshoreman, a long-distance truck driver, a bus driver, a boxer, a police constable, a postmaster, and a stand-up comic. During the sixties, he was a member of the folk singing group The Liverpool Fishermen. He wrote both poetry and music, but he began his writing career in earnest as a playwright. His three stage plays Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, and Scouse have been performed at the Everyman Theatre. He wrote Redwall for the children at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool, where he delivered milk as a truck driver. His style of writing is very descriptive, because of the nature of his first audience, for whom he painted pictures with words, so that they could see them in their imaginations. After Alan Durband, his childhood English teacher, read Redwall, he showed it to a publisher without telling Jacques. This event led to a contract for the first five books in the Redwall series. He also wrote the Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series. He died on February 5, 2011.

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