The Natural History of Pliny, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
H. G. Bohn, 1890 - Natural history
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Contents

The situation of Cappadocia
16
The Lesser and the Greater Armenia
17
The rivers Cyrus and Araxes
18
Albania Iberia and the adjoining nations
20
The passes of the Caucasus
21
The 1slands of the Euxine
22
Nations in the vicinity of the Scythian Ocean
23
The Caspian and Hyrcanian Sea
24
Adiabene
27
Media and the Caspian Gates
28
Nations situate around the Hyrcanian Sea
30
The nations of Scythia and the countries on the Eastern Ocean
33
TheSeres S3 21 The nations of India
38
The Ganges
43
The Indus
46
Taprobane
51
The Ariani and the adjoining nations 26 Voyages to India
60
Carmania
66
The Parthian Empire
68
ChaP Paite 30 Mesopotamia
70
TheTigris
75
Arabia
82
The Gulfs of the Red Sea
91
Troglodytice
93
Ethiopia
97
Islands of the Ethiopian Sea
105
The Fortunate Islands
107
The comparative distances of places on the face of the earth
108
Division of the earth into parallels and shadows of equal length
110
BOOK VII
117
The wonderful forms of different nations
122
Marvellous births
135
The generation of man the unusual duration of pregnancy in stances of it from seven to twelve months
139
Indications of the sex of the child during the pregnancy of the mother
141
Monstrous births
142
Of those who have been cut out of the womb
143
Who were called Vopisci
144
Striking instances of resemblance
145
What men are suited for generation Instances of very nume rous offspring
148
At what age generation ceases
150
Remarkable c1rcumstances connected with the menstrual discharge ib 14 The theory of generation
153
Some account of the teeth and some facts concerning infants ib 16 Examples of unusual size
155
Children remarkable for their precocity
158
Instances of extraordinary strength
160
Instances of remarkable agility
161
Instances of acuteness of sight
162
Instances of remarkable acuteness of hearing
163
Instances of endurance of pain
164
Memory ib 25 Vigour of mind
166
Clemency and greatness of mind ib 27 Heroic exploits
167
Union in the same person of three of the highest qualities with the greatest purity
169
Instances of extreme courage
170
Men of remarkable genius
173
Men who have been remarkable for wisdom
174
CoaP Pago 32 Precepts the most useful in life
178
Divination
179
The man who was pronounced to he the most excellent ib 35 The most chaste matrons
180
Names of men who have excelled in the arts astrology grammar and medicine
182
Geometry and architecture
183
Painting engraving on hronze marble and ivory carving
184
Slaves for which a high price has been given
185
Supreme happiness
186
Rare instances of good fortune continuing in the same family
187
Remarkable example of vicissitudes
189
Remarkable examples of honours ib 45 Ten very fortunate circumstances which have happened to the same person
191
The misfortunes of Augustus
195
Men whom the gods have pronounced to be the most happy
199
The greatest length of life
200
The variety of destinies at the birth of man
203
Various instances of diseases
206
Death
208
Persons who have come to life again after being laid out for burial
210
Instances of sudden death
213
Burial
217
The Manes or departed spirits of the soul
218
The inventors of various things
219
The things about which mankind first of all agreed The ancient letters
236
When the first timepieces were made
237
BOOK VIII
244
When elephants were first put into harness
245
The docil1ty of the elephant
246
Wonderful things which have been done by the elephant 247 5 The instinct of wild animals in perceiving danger
248
When elephants were first seen in Italy
251
The combats of elephants
252
The way in which elephants are caught
255
The method by which they are tamed
256
The birth of the elephant and other particulars respecting it
257
Oka Paga 11 In what countries the elephant is found the antipathy of the elephant and the dragon
259
The sagacity of these animals
260
Dragons
261
Serpents of remarkahle size ib 15 The animals of Scythia the bison
262
The animals of the north the elk the achlis and the bonasus
263
Lions how they are produced
264
The different species of lions
266
The peculiar character of the lion
267
Who it was that first introduced combats of lions at Rome and who has brought together the greatest number of lions for that purpose
269
Wonderful feats performed by lions
270
A man recognized and saved by a dragon
273
Panthers
274
when first seen at Rome their nature
275
Camels the different kinds
276
The cameleopard when it was first seen at Rome
277
The rhinoceros
278
The lynx the sphinx the crocotta and the monkey ib 31 The terrestrial animals of India
280
The animals of Ethiopia a wild beast which kills with its eye
281
The serpents called basilisks
282
Wolves the origin of the story of Versipellis ib 35 Different kinds of serpents
284
The ichneumon
287
Thescincus
288
The hippopotamus
290
Who first exhibited the hippopotamus and the crocodile at Rome ib 41 The medicinal remedies wh1ch have been borrowed from animals
291
Prognostics of danger derived from animals
294
Nat1ons that have been exterminated by animals
295
The hysena
296
The crocotta the mantichora ib 46 Wild asses
297
47 Beavers amphibious animals otters ib 48 Bramblefrogs
298
The seacalf beavers lizards ib 50 Stags
299
The chameleon
302
Other animals which change colour the tarandus the lycaon and the thos
304
The porcupine
305
ChaP Tag 55 The mice of Pontus and of the Alps
308
The leontophonus and the lynx
310
Badgers and squirrels ib 59 Vipers and snails
311
Lizards
312
The generation of the dog
316
Remedies against canine madness ib 64 The nature of the horse
317
The disposition of the horse remarkable facts concerning chariot horses
319
The generation of the horse
320
Mares impregnated by the wind
322
The nature of mules and of other beasts of burden
324
Oxen their generation
326
The Egyptian Apis
330
Sheep and their propagation
331
The different kinds of wool and their colours
333
Animals which are tamed in part only
350
Places in which certain animals are not to be found
352
Animals which injure strangers only as also animals which injure the natives of the country only and where they are found
353
BOOK IX
358
The sea monsters of the Indian Ocean
359
The largest animals that are found in each ocean
361
The forms of the Tritons and Nereids The forms of seaelephants
362
The babxna and the orca
365
Whether fishes respire and whether they sleep
367
Dolphins
369
Human beings who have been beloved by dolphins
371
Places where dolphins help men to fish
374
Other wonderful things relating to dolphins
376
Thetursio
377
Who first invented the art of cutting tortoiseshell
379
Those which are covered with hair or have none and ho hi t bring forth Seacalves or phocae
380
How many kinds of fish there are
381
Which of the fishes are of the largest size
382
Tunnies cordyla and pelamides and the various parts of them that are salted Melandrya apolecti and cybia
385
The aurias and the scomber
386
Fishes which are never found in the Euxine those which enter it and return 387
387
Why fishes leap above the surface of the water
390
That auguries are derived from fishes
391
Fishes which have a stone in the head those which keep them selves concealed during winter and those which are not taken in winter except upon stat...
392
Fishes which conceal themselves during the summer those which are influenced by the stars
396
Themullet
397
The acipenser
398
The lupus the asellus
399
The scarus the mustela
400
The various kinds of mullets and the sargus that attends them
401
Enormous prices of some fish
403
That the same kinds are not everywhere equally esteemed
404
Gills and scales
405
Fishes which have a voice Fishes without gills
406
Fishes which come on land the proper time for catching fish ib 36 Classification of fishes according to the shape of the body 407 37 The fins of fish ...
408
Eels
409
The murena ib 40 Various kinds of flat fish
411
The echeneis and its uses in enchantments
412
Fishes which change their colour
414
Fishes which fly above the waterthe seaswallowthe fish that shines in the nightthe horned fishthe seadragon
415
Fishes which have no blood Fishes known as soft fish
416
The saepia the loligo the scallop
417
The nautilus or sailing polypus
419
The sailing nauplius
422
Seaanimals which are enclosed with a crust the crayfish
423
The various kinds of crabs the pinnotheres the sea urchin cockles and scallops
424
Various kinds of shellfish 42r 53 What numerous appliances of luxury are found in the sea
428
Chap Page 54 Pearls how they are produced and where
430
How pearls are found
433
The various kinds of pearls
434
Remarkable facts connected with pearlstheir nature
436
Instances of the use of pearls
437
How pearls first came into use at Rome
440
The nature of the murex and the purple
441
The different kinds of purples
443
How wools are dyed with the juices of the purple
445
When purple was first used at Rome when the laticlave vestment and the praetexta were first worn
447
Fabrics called conchyliated
448
The amethyst the Tyrian the hysginian and the crimson tints
449
The pinna and the pinnotheres
450
The sensitiveness of wateranimals the torpedo the pastinaca the scolopendra the glanis and the ramfish
451
Bodies which have a third nature that of the animal and vegetable combinedthe seanettle
453
proofs that they are gifted with life by nature
454
Dogfish
456
Venomous seaanimals
459
The maladies of fishes
460
The generation of fishes
461
Fishes which are both oviparous and viviparous
465
Fishes the belly of which opens in spawning and then closes again
466
Fishes which have a womb those which impregnate themselves ib 78 The longest lives known amongst fishes
467
The first person that formed artificial oysterbeds ib 80 Who was the first inventor of preserves for other fish
469
Who invented preserves for murenae ib 82 Who invented preserves for seasnails
470
Landfishes
471
The mice of the Nile
472
How the fish called the anthias is taken
473
Seastars
474
The marvellous properties of the dactylus
475
BOOK X
478
The phoenix
479
The different kinds of eagles 481
481
The natural characteristics of the eagle
484
legions 48
485
An eagle which precipitated itself on the funeral pile of a girl
486
Thevulture ib 8 The birds called sangualis and immusulus
487
In what places hawks and men pursue the chase in company with each other
488
The only bird that is killed by those of its own kind A bird hat lay only one egg
489
The kite
490
Theraven 49i 16 The horned owl
492
Birds which are born with the tail first
493
Theowlet
494
The woodpecker of Mars ib 21 Birds which have hooked talons
495
Who was the first to kill the peacock for food Who first taught the art of cramming them
496
How cocks are castrated A cock that once spoke
498
Who first taught us to use the liver of the goose for food
499
The Commagenian mcdicamen
500
30 Cranes
501
yf 81 Storks
502
Swans ib 33 Foreign birds which visit us the quail the glottis the cychramus and the otus
503
Swallows
505
Birds which remain with us throughout the year birds which remain with us only six or three months whitwalls and hoopoes
506
The Meleagrides
507
The Seleucides ii
509
The melancoryphus the erithacus and the phoenicurus
511
The oenanthe the chlorion the blackbird and the ibis ib 46 The times of incubation of birds
512
the halcyon days that are favourable to navigation ib 48 Other kinds of aquatic birds
513
The acanthyllis and other birds
515
The meropspartridges
516
Pigeons
517
Wonderful things done by them prices at which they have been sold
519
Different modes of flight and progression in birds
520
The birds called apodes or cypseh
521
67 The instincts of birdsthe carduelis the taurus the anthus 52i 58 Birds which speakthe parrot ib 59 The pie which feeds on acorns
523
A sedition that arose among the Roman people in consequence of a raven speaking
524
The birds of Diomedes
526
The mode of drinking with birds The porphyrio
527
the phalerides the pheasant and the numidicse
528
The new birds The vipio
529
Fabulous birds
530
why the first Censors forbade this practice
531
other oviparous animals
532
The various kinds of eggs und their nature ib 75 Defects in broodhens and their remedies 53
535
The best kinds of fowls
536
The diseases of fowls and their remedies
537
When birds lay and how many eggs The various kinds of herons ib 80 What eggs are called bypencmiu and what cynosura How eggs ars best kept
539
The only winged animal that is viviparous and nurtures its young with its m1lk
540
The position of animals in the uterus 514
544
Salamanders
545
Animals which are born of beings that have not been born them selvesanimals which are born themselves but are not repro ductiveanimals which are ...
546
Which fishes have the best hearing
547
Diversities in the feeding of animals
548
Animals which live on earthanimals which will not die of hunger or thirst
549
Diversities in the drinking of animals
550
Instances of affection shown by serpents
552
91 What animals are subject to dreams 553
553

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