Duffy and the Devil

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR), Jan 1, 1973 - Juvenile Fiction - 40 pages
20 Reviews
Duffy and the Devil was a popular play in Cornwall in the nineteenth century, performed at the Christmas season by groups of young people who went from house to house. The Zemachs have interpreted the folk tale which the play dramatized, recognizable as a version of the widespread Rumpelstiltskin story. Its main themes are familiar, but the character and details of this picture book are entirely Cornish, as robust and distinctive as the higgledy-piggledy, cliff-hanging villages that dot England's southwestern coast from Penzance to Land's End.

The language spoken by the Christmas players was a rich mixture of local English dialect and Old Cornish (similar to Welsh and Gaelic), and something of this flavor is preserved in Harve Zemach's retelling. Margot Zemach's pen-and-wash illustrations combine a refined sense of comedy with telling observation of character, felicitous drawing with decorative richness, to a degree that surpasses her own past accomplishments. Duffy and the Devil is a 1973 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year and Outstanding Book of the Year, a 1974 National Book Award Finalist for Children's Books, and the winner of the 1974 Caldecott Medal.

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Review: Duffy and the Devil

User Review  - Andrew Lovell - Goodreads

Didn't like the illustrations and I didn't like the story. Read full review

Review: Duffy and the Devil

User Review  - Rachel Cavender - Goodreads

This was a neat little book that was very similar to Rumpelstiltskin but it adds a twist. It talks about a girl who makes clothing for her master but it is really the devil making the clothing and she has to figure out how to get out of their deal they made. Read full review

About the author (1973)

Margot Zemach (1931-89) was born in Los Angeles, California. She began illustrating stories by her husband, Harve, in 1959, and their subsequent collaborations led to many enduring children's books, including" The Judge: An Untrue Tale, a Caldecott Honor Book; A Penny a Look," an ALA Notable Book; and "Duffy and the Devil," recipient of the Caldecott Medal.

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