In Morocco

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Tauris Parke Paperbacks, Feb 5, 2005 - History - 222 pages
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"I stand in portico hung with gentian-blue ipomeas ... and look out on a land of mists and mysteries; a land of trailing silver veils through which domes and minarets, mighty towers and ramparts of flushed stone, hot palm groves and Atlas snows, peer and disappear at the will of the Atlantic cloud-drifts"

A classic of travel writing, In Morocco is Edith Wharton's remarkable account of her journey to the country during World War I. With a characteristic sense of adventure, Wharton set out to explore Morocco and its people, recording her impressions and encounters. She traveled--by military jeep--to Rabat, Moulay Idriss, Fex and Marrakech, from the Atlantic coast to the high Atlas. Along the way she witnessed religious ceremonies and ritual dances, visited the opulent palaces of the Sultan and was admitted to the mysterious world of his harem. Her narrative is as rich as the souks through which she wandered, peopled with story-tellers and warriors, slaves and silk-spinners; an evocative and intimate portrait of an extraordinary country.
  

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Contents

RABAT AND SALE
21
VOLUBILIS MOULAY IDRISS AND MEKNEZ
43
FEZ
71
MARRAKECH
103
HAREMS AND CEREMONIES
129
GENERAL LYAUTEYS WORK IN MOROCCO
161
A SKETCH OF MOROCCAN HISTORY
177
NOTE ON MOROCCAN ARCHITECTURE
198
BOOKS CONSULTED
210
INDEX
213
Copyright

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Page 15 - Morocco is a land of mists and mysteries, of trailing silver veils through which minarets, mighty towers, hot palm groves and Atlas snows peer and disappear at the will of the Atlantic clouddrifts. ITALIAN BACKGROUNDS No.

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About the author (2005)

Edith Wharton wrote more than forty volumes of novels, poetry, essays, memoirs and travel books, including The House of Mirth, and The Age of Innocence, for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She died in 1937.

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