The Silent Shakespeare (Google eBook)

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W. J. Campbell, 1915 - 210 pages
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Attributing the authorship of Shakespeare's works to William Stanley, 6th earl of Derby.
  

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Page 119 - ... thy writings to be such, As neither Man nor Muse can praise too much. 'Tis true, and all men's suffrage. But these ways Were not the paths I meant unto thy praise; For seeliest...
Page 106 - Why is my verse so barren of new pride, So far from variation or quick change ? Why with the time do I not glance aside To new-found methods and to compounds strange...
Page 33 - Yes, trust them not: for there is an upstart crow beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart, wrapt in a player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.
Page 126 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory, on this side idolatry, as much as any. He was indeed honest, and of an. open and free nature ; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions...
Page 120 - The applause! delight! the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise; I will not lodge thee by Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further to make thee a room: Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live, And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Page 122 - To life again, to hear thy buskin tread And shake a stage ; or, when thy socks were on, Leave thee alone for the comparison Of all that insolent Greece or haughty Rome Sent forth, or since did from their ashes come.
Page 113 - This Figure, that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut...
Page 124 - Yet must I not give nature all; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part; For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion; and that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, Such as thine are, and strike the second heat Upon the muses...
Page 125 - As brand ish't at the eyes of ignorance. Sweet Swan of Avon ! What a sight it were To see thee in our waters yet appeare, And make those flights upon the bankes of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James!
Page 82 - But if the first heir of my invention prove deformed, I shall be sorry it had so noble a godfather, and never after ear so barren a land, for fear it yield me still so bad a harvest.

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