The Swineherd

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North-South Books, 1982 - Juvenile Fiction - 26 pages
3 Reviews
A prince disguises himself as a swineherd and learns the true character of the princess he desires.

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Review: The Swineherd

User Review  - Nohely - Goodreads

This story is amazing! Most of you may know that I love Hans Christian Andersen and I must admit that this story is at my top 5 favorites. This beign number 4. The story centers around this spoiled ... Read full review

Review: The Swineherd

User Review  - Paul - Goodreads

A very funny story, and strange so few people know about it. It's ludicrous! A swineherd going behind a tree to transform into a Prince! It's like something you'd expect in a comic book! Read full review

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About the author (1982)

Hans Christian Andersen, one of the best known figures in literature, is best know for combining traditional folk tales with his own great imagination to produce fairy tales known to most children today. The Danish writer was born in the slums of Odense. Although he was raised in poverty, he eventually attended Copenhagen University. Although Andersen wrote poems, plays and books, he is best known for his Fairy Tales and Other Stories, written between 1835 and 1872. This work includes such famous tales as The Emperor's New Clothes, Little Ugly Duckling, The Tinderbox, Little Claus and Big Claus, Princess and the Pea, The Snow Queen, The Little Mermaid, The Nightingale, The Story of a Mother and The Swineherd. Andersen's greatest work is still influential today, helping mold some of the works of writers ranging from Charles Dickens to Oscar Wilde and inspiring many of the works of Disney and other motion pictures. Andersen, who traveled greatly during his life, died in his home in Rolighed on August 4, 1875.

Lisbeth Zwerger was born in Vienna in 1954. After studying at the Applied Arts Academy of Vienna she became an award-winning illustrator. Her style is similar to that of English illustrators of the 19th century. In 1990 she won the the Hans Christian Andersen Medal as well as special recognition at the Bologna Children's Book Fair. Her Noah's Ark, Little Red Cap and The Wizard of Oz were all selected by The New York Times as a "Best Illustrated Books of the Year.

Anthea Bell was born in Suffolk, was educated at Somerville College, Oxford, and has worked as a translator for a number of years, primarily from German and French. Her translations include works of non-fiction, literary and popular fiction, and books for young people including classic German works by the Brothers Grimm, Clemens Brentano, Wilhelm Hauff and Christian Morgenstern. Bell has also served on the committee of the Translators` Association and the jury panel of the Schlegel-Tieck German translation prize in Great Britain. She has been the recipient of a number of translation prizes and awards, among them the 1987 Schlegel-Tieck Award for Hans Berman's The Stone and the Flute (Viking) and the first Marsh Award for Children's Literature in Translation for Christine Nöstlinger's A Dog's Life (Andersen Press). Bell was selected by a five-member jury as the recipient of the 2002 Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator¿s Prize for her exceptional translation of W.G. Sebald's novel Austerlitz, published Random House. He also won the Oxford Weidenfeld Translation Prize in 2009 for How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone.

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