The Russian Revolution

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Vintage Books, Nov 5, 1991 - History - 944 pages
5 Reviews
Mr. Pipes writes trenchantly, and at times superbly....No single volume known to me even begins to cater so adequately to those who want to discover what really happened to Russia....Nor do I know any other book better designed to help Soviet citizens to struggle out of the darkness."

-- Ronald Hingley, The New York Times Book Review

Ground-breaking in its inclusiveness, enthralling in its narrative of a movement whose purpose, in the words of Leon Trotsky, was "to overthrow the world," The Russian Revolution draws conclusions that have already aroused great controversy in this country-and that are certain to be explosive when the book is published in the Soviet Union. Richard Pipes argues convincingly that the Russian Revolution was an intellectual, rather than a class, uprising; that it was steeped in terror from its very outset; and that it was not a revolution at all but a coup d'etat -- "the capture of governmental power by a small minority."

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Review: The Russian Revolution

User Review  - sologdin - Goodreads

surly cold warrior laments the death of the royal family. Read full review

Review: The Russian Revolution

User Review  - Derek - Goodreads

It was fascinating to see real living examples of secret combinations and murders on which the formation of the Soviet Union relied. It was nothing short than the work of the adversary through the ... Read full review

Contents

PART ONE The Agony of the Old Regime
1
ment of the campaign 742
23
Official Russia
53
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Richard Pipes, Baird Research Professor of History at Harvard University, is the author of numerous books and essays. In 1981-82 he served as President Reagan's National Security Council adviser on Soviet and East European affairs. He has twice received a Guggenheim Fellowship. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Chesham, New Hampshire.

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