The Heart of the Buddha (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Shambhala Publications, 2010 - Religion - 208 pages
14 Reviews

 In The Heart of the Buddha, the Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa presents the basic teachings of Buddhism as they relate to everyday life. The book is divided into three parts. In “Personal Journey,” the author discusses the open, inquisitive, and good-humored qualities of the “heart of the Buddha,” an “enlightened gene” that everyone possesses. In “Stages on the Path,” he presents the three vehicles—Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayana—that carry the Buddhist practitioner toward enlightenment. In “Working with Others,” he describes the direct application of Buddhist teachings to topics as varied as relationships, drinking, children, and money. The Heart of the Buddha reflects Trungpa’s great appreciation for Western culture and deep understanding of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which enabled him to teach Westerners in an effective, contemporary way.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
12
4 stars
2
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: The Heart of the Buddha: Entering the Tibetan Buddhist Path (Dharma Ocean)

User Review  - Gerald - Goodreads

Great book on what being a Shambhala Buddhist means. Written in the typical Trungpa irreverent and practical style. Loved it. Read full review

Review: The Heart of the Buddha: Entering the Tibetan Buddhist Path (Dharma Ocean)

User Review  - Goodreads

Great book on what being a Shambhala Buddhist means. Written in the typical Trungpa irreverent and practical style. Loved it. Read full review

Contents

What Is the Heart of the Buddha?
3
Intellect and Intuition
12
The Four Foundations of Mindfulness
18
Devotion
47
stages on the path
67
Taking Refuge
69
Bodhisattva Vow
87
The Practice of Vajrayogini
106
Acknowledging Death
143
Alcohol as Medicine or Poison
150
A Talk for Children
155
Dharma Poetics
161
Green Energy
167
Manifesting Enlightenment
169
The Bon Way of Life
177
The Vajrayogini Shrine
187

working with others
137
Relationship
139
List of Sources
193
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Chogyam Trungpa was one of the most visibly active of the Tibetan Buddhist refugees to come to the West and to lay the foundation in Europe and North America for the study of the Tibetan traditions. Born the son of a farmer and considered the eleventh incarnation of Trungpa Tulku, he was given a traditional training in religious philosophy but in his teens had to be hidden from the invading Chinese. Fleeing in 1959 when the Communists invaded Tibet, he ultimately moved to Great Britain, where he studied comparative religion at Oxford University and established a Tibetan meditation center in Scotland. He moved to the United States in 1970 and established the Buddhist university, Naropa, in Colorado. Naropa became the center for seminars, many of which he cotaught with prominent American artists, scholars, and scientists. His philosophical goal was to present traditional Tibetan Buddhist teachings in a new manner that would help them take root in Western soil. In that way, he would both preserve the insights of his culture and bring Buddhist philosophy to the benefit of humanity at large.

Bibliographic information