Atlanta University Publications, Issue 5 (Google eBook)

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Atlanta University Press, 1900 - African Americans
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Page 65 - ... social classes. All these things must be slowly and painfully evolved. The preacher was, even before the war, the group leader of the Negroes, and the church their greatest social institution. Naturally this preacher was ignorant and often immoral, and the problem of replacing the older type by better educated men has been a difficult one. Both by direct work and by...
Page 28 - Negroes have attended Northern colleges for many years. As early as 1826 one was graduated from Bowdoin College, and from that time till today nearly every year has seen elsewhere other such graduates. They have, of course, met much color prejudice. Fifty years ago very few colleges would admit them at all. Even today no Negro has ever been admitted to Princeton, and at some other leading institutions they are rather endured than encouraged. Oberlin was the great pioneer...
Page 32 - ... though in consequence of existing prejudices it was not always easy to do so. She procured friends for him. Marrying again, she was careful to stipulate that John should not lose his home. Through his own exertions, with some help from others, he was at length enabled to enter college and to complete the usual course. It should be remembered to the credit of his fellow-students in Brunswick, that peculiar as his position was among them, they were careful to avoid everything that might tend to...
Page 65 - It has, however, been in the furnishing of teachers that the Negro college has found its peculiar function. Few persons realize how vast a work, how mighty a revolution has been thus accomplished. To furnish five millions and more of ignorant people with teachers of their own race and blood, in one generation, was not only a very difficult undertaking, but a very important one, in that, it placed before the eyes of almost every Negro child an attainable ideal.
Page 29 - ... course, met much color prejudice. Fifty years ago very few colleges would admit them at all. Even today no Negro has ever been admitted to Princeton, and at some other leading institutions they are rather endured than encouraged. Oberlin was the great pioneer in the work of blotting out the color line in colleges, and has more Negro graduates by far than any other Northern college. The total number of Negro college graduates up to 1899 (several of the graduates of that year not being reported)...
Page 65 - These figures illustrate vividly the function of the college-bred Negro. He is, as he ought to be, the group leader, the man who sets the ideals of the community where he lives, directs its thoughts and heads its social movements.
Page 82 - Another Boston lawyer has been alderman of Cambridge for several years. A Philadelphia lawyer says: "My practice is largely confined to Jews. The better class of Negroes is not so likely to patronize me as the whites are.
Page 71 - ... prominent in political affairs. Yet one of them has been a member of three successive National Republican Conventions and another has represented his county in the Georgia legislature, while a third has served two terms in the Texas legislature, being elected by the aid of the votes of Southern white men in a predominantly white community. SOCIAL REFORM. "And it is not out of place to say a few words in this connection concerning the remarkable work which this last named graduate, Robert L. Smith...
Page 57 - States some regularity was established, which on the Virginia plantations approached as near the monogamic ideal as the slave trade and concubinage would allow. With emancipation came the independent Negro home. Naturally the poor training of Negro women, the lack of respect or chivalry toward them, and the fact that the field-hand never had the responsibility of family life, all tended to make pure homes difficult to establish and maintain. Without doubt the greatest social problem of the American...
Page 69 - Graduates of a Single Typical College. — It might be well here to turn from the more general figures to the graduates of a single representative institution. A graduate of Dartmouth College who has been in the work of educating Negro youth for over thirty years writes as follows in a small publication which gives the record of Atlanta University graduates, including the class of 1899: "This leaflet covers an experience Of about a quarter of a century of graduating classes. It will tell of the work...

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