Names of dramas: M-Z. Latin plays by English authors. Oratorios. Appendix to v. 2 and 3. Additions and correction to v. 2 and 3 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1812 - English drama
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Page 109 - Excellent wretch ! Perdition catch my soul, But I do love thee ! and when I love thee not Chaos is come again.
Page 227 - For physic and farces his equal there scarce is— His farces are physic, his physic a farce is.
Page 158 - They boast they come but to improve our state, enlarge our thoughts, and free us from the yoke of error ! Yes ; they will give enlightened freedom to our minds, who are themselves the slaves of passion, avarice, and pride. They offer us their protection : yes; such protection as vultures give to lambs — covering and devouring them ! They call on us to barter all of good we have inherited and proved, for the desperate chance of something better which they promise. Be our plain answer this : —...
Page 82 - Fountain heads and pathless groves, Places which pale passion loves ! Moonlight walks, when all the fowls Are warmly housed save bats and owls ! A midnight bell, a parting groan ! These are the sounds we feed upon ; Then stretch our bones in a still gloomy valley ; Nothing's so dainty sweet as lovely melancholy.
Page 158 - The throne we honour is the people's choice ; the laws we reverence are our brave fathers' legacy ; the faith we follow teaches us to live in bonds of charity with all mankind, and die with hope of bliss beyond the grave. Tell your invaders this, and tell them, too, we seek no change : and, least of all, such change as they would bring us.
Page 60 - Looking tranquillity! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart.
Page 111 - The fiery openness of Othello, magnanimous, artless, and credulous, boundless in his confidence, ardent in his affection, inflexible in his resolution, and obdurate in his revenge; the cool malignity of lago, silent in his resentment, subtle in his designs, and studious at once of his interest and his vengeance...
Page 60 - And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chilness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice ; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Page 116 - Passage (from the Tower) through his Honourable Citie (and Chamber) of London, being the 15. of March, 1603. As well by the English as by the Strangers : With the Speeches and Songes, delivered in the severall Pageants.
Page 42 - WILD and fantastical as this play is, all the parts, in their various modes, are well written, and give the kind of pleasure which the author designed. Fairies in his time were much in fashion ; common tradition had made them familiar, and Spenser's poem had made them great JOHNSON.

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