The Tatler; Or, Lucubrations of Isaac Bickerstaff, Esq, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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C. Bathurst, J. Buckland, W. Strahan, J. and F. Rivington, 1774 - English essays
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Page 212 - ... accent of Christians, nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted, and bellowed, that I have thought some of Nature's journeymen had made men, and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
Page 259 - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel, by divine command, With rising tempests shakes a guilty land (Such as of late o'er pale Britannia passed), Calm and serene he drives the furious blast ; And, pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
Page 31 - He was not by any means to be forced from the body, but was removed with it bleeding in his arms, and attended with tears by all their comrades who knew their enmity. When he was brought to a tent, his wounds were dressed...
Page 291 - In this accomplished lady, love is the constant effect, because it is never the design. Yet, though her mien carries much more invitation than command, to behold her is an immediate check to loose behaviour; and to love her is a liberal education...
Page 77 - His wandering feet the magic paths pursue ; And while he thinks the fair illusion true, The trackless scenes disperse in fluid air, And woods and wilds, and thorny ways appear : A tedious road the weary wretch returns, And, as he goes, the transient vision mourns.
Page 271 - ... to benevolence, and tend to a certain manner of being or appearing equal to the rest of the company ; for conversation is composed of an assembly of men, as they are men, and not as they are distinguished by fortune: therefore he who brings his quality with him into conversation, should always pay the reckoning ; for he came to receive homage, and not to meet his friends.
Page 150 - I am going about, and run over in my imagination all the endless crowd of men of honour who will be offended at such a discourse; I am undertaking, methinks, a work worthy an invulnerable hero in romance, rather than a private gentleman with a single rapier...
Page 92 - This careless jade was eternally romping with the footman, and downright starved me ; insomuch that I daily pined away, and should never have been relieved had it not been that, on the thirtieth day of my life, a Fellow of the Royal Society, who had writ upon Cold Baths...
Page 15 - Homer, and the design of it, is a good representation of the age in which that comedy was written ; at which time love and wenching were the business of life, and the gallant manner of pursuing women was the best recommendation at Court.
Page 6 - Theodosius of Greece, and Henry the Eighth of England. It is well known, he has been in the condition of each of those illustrious personages for several hours together, and behaved himself in those high stations, in all the changes of the scene, with suitable dignity. For these reasons, we intend to repeat this...

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