The Broad Highway (Google eBook)

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Little, Brown, 1911 - English Fiction - 518 pages
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Review: The Broad Highway

User Review  - Pippa - Goodreads

This was my grandparents' favourite book. They were born right at the very beginning of the twentieth century, and they felt that Jeffery Farnol's books described their world exactly as it was when ... Read full review

Review: The Broad Highway

User Review  - Nicholas Whyte - Goodreads

http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1794675... This was the best-selling novel of 1911, a romantic tale set in about 1811 where you know what is going to happen from the very first page, when Peter Vibart ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

In Which I Meet with a Pedler by the Name of Gabbing Dick
91
How I Heard the Steps of One Who Dogged Me in the Shadows
95
How I Talked with a Madman in a Wood by Moonlight
101
The HedgeTavern
106
In Which I Become a Squire of Dames
111
Concerning Daemons in General and One in Par ticular
117
Journeys End in LoversMeetings
121
In Which I Meet with a Literary Tinker
127
Concerning Happiness a Ploughman and Silver Buttons
135
Which Introduces the Reader to the Ancient
138
Of Black George the Smith and How We Threw the Hammer
145
Wherein I Learn More Concerning the Ghost of the Ruined Hut
164
Which Tells How and in What Manner I Saw the Ghost
167
The Highland Piper
173
How Black George and I Shook Hands
178
In Which I Forswear Myself and Am Accused of Possessing the Evil Eye
184
In Which Donald Bids Me Farewell
190
In Which this First Book Begins to Draw to a Close
194
Chapter Page XXXIII In Which We Draw yet Nearer to the End of this First Book
203
Which Describes Sundry Happenings at the Fair and Ends this First Book
207
A Word to the Reader
219
BOOK IITHE WOMAN
220
Of Storm and Tempest and of the Coming of Channian
223
The Postilion
232
Which Bears Ample Testimony to the Strength of the Gentlemans Fists
236
Which among other Matters has to do with Bruises and Bandages
240
In Which I Hear 1ll News of George
249
In Which I Learn of an Impending Danger
258
Which Narrates a Somewhat Remarkable Conver sation
263
In Which I See a Vision in the Glory of the Moon and Eat of a Poached Rabbit
267
Which Relates Somewhat of Charmian Brown
273

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Page 160 - All provisions of sections ninety-two, ninetythree, ninety-four, ninety-five, ninety-six, ninety-seven, ninety-eight, ninety-nine, one hundred, one hundred and one, one hundred and two, one hundred and three, one hundred and four...
Page 378 - Her name was Barbara Allen. All in the merry month of May, When green buds they were swellin', Young Jemmy Grove on his death-bed lay, For love of Barbara Allen. He sent his man in to her then, To the town where she was dwellin', "O haste and come to my master dear, If your name be Barbara Allen.
Page 151 - I do not love thee, Dr. Fell, the reason why I cannot tell, But this I know and know full well, I do not love thee, Dr. Fell...
Page 356 - For her love I cark and care For her love I droop and dare For her love my bliss is bare And all I waxe wan; For her love in sleep I slake, For her love all night I wake For her love mourning I make More than any man.
Page 427 - All in the merry month of May, When green buds they were swellin', Young Jemmy Grove on his death-bed lay, For love of Barbara Allen. He sent his man in to her then. To the town where she was dwellin', "O haste and come to my master dear, "If your name be Barbara Allen." So slowly, slowly rase she up, And slowly she came nigh him, And when she drew the curtain by 'Young man, I think you're dyin'.
Page 471 - IN Scarlet town, where I was born, There was a fair maid dwellin', Made every youth cry Well-a-way! Her name was Barbara Allen. All in the merry month of May, When green buds they were swellin', Young Jemmy Grove on his death-bed lay, For love of Barbara Allen.
Page 470 - For all my chamber gan to ring Through singing of their armony. For instrument nor melody Was nowhere heard yet half so sweet Nor of accorde half so meet ; For there was none of them that feigned To sing ; for each of them him pained To find out merry crafty notes ; They ne spared not their throats.
Page 1 - I went on, ticking off each item on my fingers, " come Tom Cragg, the pugilist " " Better and better ! " nodded the Tinker. " a one-legged soldier of the Peninsula, an adventure at a lonely tavern, a flight through woods at midnight pursued by desperate villains, and a most extraordinary tinker. So far so good, I think, and it all sounds adventurous enough.
Page 132 - I mean that truly great books only happen, and very rarely." " But a scholar may happen to write a great book," said the Tinker. " To be sure he may ; a book that nobody will risk publishing, and if so a book that nobody will trouble to read, nowadays." "Why so?" " Because this is an eminently unliterary age, incapable of thought, and therefore seeking to be amused. Whereas the writing of books was once a painful art, it has of late become a trick very easy of accomplishment, requiring no...
Page 4 - As for your book, wot you have to do is to give 'em a little blood now and then with plenty of love and you can't go far wrong ! " Now whether the Tinker's theory for the writing of a good novel be right or wrong, I will not presume to say. But in this book that lies before you, though you shall read, if you choose, of country things and ways and people, yet, because that part of my life herein recorded was a something hard, rough life, you shall read also of blood ; and, because I came, in the end,...

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