Shakespeare Illustrated by Old Authors, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1867
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Page 14 - Music and poesy use to quicken you ; The mathematics, and the metaphysics, Fall to them, as you find your stomach serves you: No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en ; — In brief, sir, study what you most affect.
Page 9 - Methought I heard a voice cry "Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep," the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M.
Page 68 - Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty : let us be — Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon : And let men say, we be men of good government; being governed as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we — steal.
Page 38 - The dear repose for limbs with travel tired; But then begins a journey in my head To work my mind, when body's work's expired. For then my thoughts, from far where I abide, Intend a zealous pilgrimage to thee, And keep my drooping eyelids open wide...
Page 83 - He looks and laughs at a' that. A prince can mak' a belted knight, A marquis, duke, and a' that ; But an honest man's aboon his might — Guid faith, he mauna fa' that ! For a
Page 8 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.
Page 60 - Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face, Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night. Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny What I have spoke: but farewell compliment! Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say 'Ay,' And I will take thy word: yet, if thou swear'st, Thou mayst prove false: at lovers' perjuries, They say, Jove laughs.
Page 32 - A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye. In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julins fell, The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets...
Page 69 - Sir Hugh, persuade me not ; I will make a Starchamber matter of it : if he were twenty Sir John Falstaffs, he shall not abuse Robert Shallow, esquire. Slen. In the county of Gloster, justice of peace and coram. Shal. Ay, cousin Slender, and cust-alorum. Slen. Ay, and ratolorum too; and a gentleman born, master parson ; who writes himself armigero, — in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, armigero.
Page 26 - But come; Here, as before, never, so help you mercy, How strange or odd soe'er I bear myself, — As I perchance hereafter shall think meet To put an antic disposition on...

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