Arab and Jewish Immigrants in Latin America: Images and Realities

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Ignacio Klich, Jeff Lesser
Psychology Press, 1998 - History - 263 pages
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This collection of essays addresses various aspects of Arab and Jewish immigration and acculturation in Latin America. It is a volume that is neither about the repercussions of the Arab-Israeli conflict outside the Middle East, nor one which ignores some of its Latin American ramifications.
Immigration's promoters - Latin American elites keen to change their countries' ethnic mix - felt threatened by the arrival of Arabs and Jews. Hence, identifying the similarities in local reaction to both immigrant groups' economic and other successes, as well as their retention of varying degrees of pre-migratory culture and other aspects of their experiences, can offer a crucial contribution to changing the ways immigration and ethnicity in Latin America are understood. On the other hand, any such change cannot ignore the differences in the experiences of Arab and Jewish immigrants.
  

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Contents

Elite
38
Arabs and Jews in the Development of the Louise Fawcett
57
The ArabJewish Economic Presence in
94
Christians from
125
The Economic and Social Condition
146
Ethnic History Nationalism
167
The Selfimage
189
The Historiography of Jewish Immigration
204
The Historiography of Arab Immigration
227
Notes on Contributors
249
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About the author (1998)

Jeffrey Lesser is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Latin American History and Chair of the History Department at Emory University. He is the author of A Discontented Diaspora: Japanese-Brazilians and the Meanings of Ethnic Militancy, 1960 1980 (2007), which received an honorable mention for the Roberto Reis Prize from the Brazilian Studies Association; Negotiating National Identity: Minorities, Immigrants, and the Struggle for Ethnicity in Brazil (1999), winner of the Best Book Prize from the Brazil section of the Latin American Studies Association; and Welcoming the Undesirables: Brazil and the Jewish Question (1994), which won the Best Book Prize from the New England Council on Latin American Studies.

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