The absolute at large

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Hyperion Press, 1974 - Fiction - 242 pages
25 Reviews
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Hesperides Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

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Review: The Absolute at Large

User Review  - Lauren - Goodreads

Can't categorize this as a must read, but it was interesting. It helped to keep in mind the context of the writer; 1920s in newly formed Czechoslovakia, and that it is meant to be political satire ... Read full review

Review: The Absolute at Large

User Review  - Steve - Goodreads

This is a story of unintended consequences. An inventor comes up with a machine that will produce power from anything by destroying it utterly. A solution to the energy crisis, with strings attached ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER PAGE I The Advertisement i
1
The Karburator
8
Pantheism
16
Copyright

27 other sections not shown

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About the author (1974)

Karel Capek is best known abroad for his plays, but at home he is also revered as an accomplished novelist, short-story writer, essayist, and writer of political articles. His bitingly satirical novel The War with the Newts (1936) reveals his understanding of the possible consequences of scientific advance. The novel Krakatit (1924), about an explosive that could destroy the world, foreshadows the feared potential of a nuclear disaster. In his numerous short stories he depicts the problems of modern life and common people in a humorous and whimsically philosophical fashion. The plays of Karel Capek presage the Theater of the Absurd. R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) (1921) was a satire on the machine age. He created the word robot from the Czech noun robota, meaning "work" for the human-made automatons who in that play took over the world, leaving only one human being alive. The Insect Comedy (1921), whose characters are insects, is an ironic fantasy on human weakness. The Makropoulos Secret (1923), later used as the basis for Leos Janacek's opera, was an experimental piece that questioned whether immortality is really desirable. All the plays have been produced successfully in New York. Most deal satirically with the modern machine age or with war. Underlying all his work, though, is a faith in humanity, truth, justice, and democracy, which has made him one of the most beloved of all Czech writers.

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