Stranger in Ireland; or, A tour in the southern and western parts of that country in the year 1805 (Google eBook)

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Bradford, 1806 - Ireland - 350 pages
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Page 27 - Iren. Because the commodity doth not countervail the discommodity ; for the inconveniences which thereby do arise are much more many ; for it is a fit house for an outlaw, a meet bed for a rebel, and an apt cloak for a thief.
Page 301 - In vain for him the officious wife prepares The fire fair-blazing, and the vestment warm, In vain his little children, peeping out Into the mingling storm, demand their sire, With tears of artless innocence. Alas ! Nor wife, nor children, more shall he behold, Nor friends, nor sacred home.
Page 298 - No matter in what language his doom may have been pronounced ; no matter what complexion incompatible with freedom, an Indian or an African sun may have burnt upon him ; no matter in what disastrous battle his liberty may have been cloven down ; no matter with what solemnities he may have been devoted upon the altar of slavery ; the first moment he touches the sacred soil of Britain, the altar and the god sink together in the dust ; his soul walks abroad in her own majesty ; his body swells beyond...
Page 10 - In yon bright track that fires the western skies They melt, they vanish from my eyes. But oh ! what solemn scenes on Snowdon's height Descending slow their glittering skirts unroll? Visions of glory, spare my aching sight, Ye unborn ages, crowd not on my soul!
Page 301 - ... pass along ! Retire to the bosom of your families and your children, and when you are presiding over the morality of the parental board, tell those infants, who are to be the future men of Ireland, the history of this day. Form their young minds by your precepts, and confirm those precepts by your own example ; teach them how discreetly allegiance may be perjured on the table, or loyalty be...
Page 304 - ... neglected, do not strike him into that most dreadful of all human conditions, the orphanage that springs not from the grave, that falls not from the hand of Providence, or the stroke of death ; but comes before its time, anticipated and inflicted by the remorseless cruelty of parental guilt.
Page 303 - He seemed a twin star of the defendant, equal in honour, in confidence; equal also (for who could be superior?) in probity and humanity. To this gentleman was my client consigned and in his custody he remained about seven weeks, unthought of by the world, as if he had never existed. The oblivion of the buried is as profound as the oblivion of the dead. His family may have mourned his absence or his probable death, but why should I mention so paltry a circumstance?
Page 27 - When it raineth it is his pent-house; when it bloweth it is his tent ; when it freezeth it is his tabernacle. In summer he can wear it loose, in winter he can wrap it close ; at all times he can use it ; never heavy, never cumbersome.
Page 253 - Fewness of people, is real poverty; and a Nation wherein are Eight Millions of people, are more than twice as rich as the same scope of Land wherein are but Four...
Page 302 - Merciful God, what is the state of Ireland, and where shall you find the wretched inhabitant of this land...

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