Machine That Would Go of Itself: The Constitution in American Culture (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, 1986 - Constitutional history - 530 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

A machine that would go of itself: the Constitution in American culture

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A timely historical survey of American lay thought and attitude toward the Constitution from the 1780s to the present by Pulitzer Prize-winner Kammen ( People of Paradox ). With a mix of reverence and ... Read full review

Contents

The Problem of Constitutionalism in American Culture
3
THE MOST WONDERFUL INSTRUMENT EVER DRAWN BY THE HAND OF MAN
41
To Make the Constitution a Practical System
43
All That Gives Us a National Character
68
The Constitution Threatens to Be a Subject of Infinite Sects
95
A MACHINE THAT WOULD GO OF ITSELF
125
On This Day One Hundred Years Ago
127
The American and the British Constitution Are Two Entirely Different Things
156
THE PENDULUM OF PUBLIC OPINION
313
Illegal Defiance of Constitutional Authority
315
Our Bill of Rights Is Under Subtle and Pervasive Attack
336
The Public Got Strange and Distorted Views of the Court and Its Rulings
357
Its What Holds Us All Together
381
A Note on the Sources
403
A Supplementary Note on Iconography
405
A Constitution for the New Deal by H L Mencken
407

The Crisis in Constitutionalism
185
AMERICA IS ALWAYS TALKING ABOUT ITS CONSTITUTION
217
God Knows How Dearly We Need a Constitutional Revival
219
Decisions Are Politics When Constitutional Questions Are Up for Decision
255
My God Making a Racket out of the Constitution
282
Abbreviations
411
Notes
413
Index
509
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information