Early English Prose Romances: With Bibliographical and Historical Introductions, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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William John Thoms
Nattali and Bond, 1858 - English literature
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Page xi - Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And after one hour more 'twill be eleven. And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe, And then from hour to hour we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.
Page 205 - ... from perfection of the worke as they were before, for they knew not how to give those parts that they had made motion, without which it was impossible that it should speake...
Page 305 - Syntax's (Dr.) Three Tours: In Search of the Picturesque, in Search of Consolation, and in Search of a Wife. With the whole of ROWLANDSON'S droll page Illustrations in Colours and a Life of the Author by JC HOTTEN.
Page 206 - ... if they heard it not before it had done speaking all their labour should be lost ; they, being satisfied, licensed the spirit for to depart. " Then went these two learned...
Page 100 - But now, quoth he, we will change our chidings to kissings, and it vexeth me that these cherry lipps should be subiect to such a Lobcocke as thy husband. Subiect to him, quoth she : In faith sir, no, I will haue my lips at as much liberty as my tongue, the one to say what I list, and the other to touch whom I like : In troth, shall I tell thee, Cutbert, the churles breath smels so strong, that I care as much for kissing of him, as for looking on him...
Page 206 - Brasen head would speake : thus watched they for three weekes without any rest, so that they were so weary and sleepy, that they could not any longer...
Page 152 - ... was followed, and when they had listned at his chamber doore, they heard the man sound asleepe : All is safe, quoth they, and downe into the kitchin they goe, their...
Page 186 - Now letting slip this critical opportunity, he missed the intended treasure : which had he obtained, he might have made out the tradition of making a brazen wall about England, that is, the most powerful defence or strongest fortification which gold could have effected.
Page 88 - Grod hath allotted me to this misery of life, I will frame my heart to embrace humility, and carry a mind answerable to my misfortunes, fie on this Vaine title of Ladiship, how little doth it auaile the distressed ? No, no, I must therefore forget my birth and parentage, and think no more on my fathers house, where I was wont to...
Page 185 - Every ear is filled with the story of Friar Bacon, that made a brazen head to speak these words, time is? Which though there want not the like relations,^ surely too literally received, and was but a mystical fable concerning the philosopher's great work, wherein he eminently laboured : implying no more by the copper head, than the vessel wherein it was wrought, and by the words it spake, than the opportunity to be...

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