History of United States Naval Operations in World War II: The rising sun in the Pacific, 1931-April 1942

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 2001 - History - 480 pages
0 Reviews
Packed with vivid firsthand observations, this multivolume account of naval activities during World War II applies a seaman's eye to the technique of a professional historian.

With the approval of President Roosevelt, esteemed military historian Samuel Eliot Morison was commissioned in the Naval Reserve with the sole duty of preparing a full, accurate, public record of the war at sea. Morison had access to records of all naval activities, afloat and ashore, and to official documents, and was given authority to discuss them with all naval personnel concerned. He visited the various theaters of war, served on eleven combat ships, and took part in several amphibious operations and surface engagements with the enemy.

Offering the immediacy of events as they unfold, Morison's record conveys the urgency of planning and preparations, the excitement of battle, exultation over hard-won success, and sorrow for fallen comrades. Along with firsthand experience and oral testimony, his account makes use of official documents including the German Admiralty Records that were seized after the war.

Through a skillful counterpoint of perspectives, Morison provides a clear and detailed view of American efforts to keep transport lanes open, German reluctance to allocate major resources to the war at sea, and the influence on strategy of what each side thought the other capable of. Published in fifteen volumes, Morison's history is generously illustrated with maps, charts, and candid photographs that intensify the reader's sense of being in the middle of the action.

The Rising Sun in the Pacific, 1931-April 1942 chronicles the difficult early months of the campaign in the Pacific, detailing thenavy's reverses at Wake Island, in the Philippines, and along the Malay Barrier.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IV
3
V
6
VI
10
VII
12
VIII
19
IX
35
X
40
XI
48
XL
255
XLI
259
XLII
269
XLIII
271
XLIV
273
XLV
277
XLVI
280
XLVII
283

XII
56
XIII
62
XIV
64
XV
80
XVI
88
XVII
95
XVIII
98
XIX
127
XX
147
XXI
149
XXII
157
XXIII
164
XXIV
168
XXV
174
XXVI
178
XXVII
184
XXVIII
187
XXIX
193
XXX
203
XXXI
207
XXXII
209
XXXIII
214
XXXIV
218
XXXV
223
XXXVI
229
XXXVII
235
XXXVIII
244
XXXIX
249
XLVIII
285
XLIX
292
L
298
LI
303
LII
305
LIII
311
LIV
314
LV
321
LVI
330
LVII
332
LVIII
335
LIX
336
LX
338
LXI
342
LXII
343
LXIII
347
LXIV
351
LXV
353
LXVI
359
LXVII
363
LXVIII
370
LXIX
375
LXX
377
LXXI
381
LXXII
387
LXXIII
389
LXXIV
399
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Samuel Eliot Morison was born in Boston in 1887. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. He served as the university's official historian and wrote a three-volume history of the institution, the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. He also was an accomplished sailor who retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral. In preparing for his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies of Christopher Columbus and John Paul Jones, Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1941) and John Paul Jones: A Sailor's Biography (1952) he took himself out of the study and onto the high seas, where he traced the voyages of his subjects and "lived" their stories insofar as possible. When it came time for the U.S. Navy to select an author to write a history of its operations in World War II, Morison was the natural choice for the task. In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts. He was an "American historian" in the fullest sense of the term. He also had a keen appreciation for the larger history of the nation and world, provincial is the last word one would use to describe Morison's writing.

Bibliographic information