Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-four: Text, Sources, Criticism

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Jan 1, 1982 - Dystopias in literature - 450 pages
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Review: Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four: Text, Sources, Criticism

User Review  - Brittany - Goodreads

This book was a very thought provoking story. Makes me wish that more people would read it and realize how a world like that could come into being. Read full review

Review: Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four: Text, Sources, Criticism

User Review  - Robert - Goodreads

From a few discussions I have read recently, it seems this book is seldom read these days. I suppose it makes sense given the title of the book. For folks my age and older, this was required reading ... Read full review

Contents

PART ONE Text
1
Aldous Huxley from Brave New World
209
Eugene Zamiatin from We
224
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1982)

George Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair in 1903 in Motihari in Bengal, India and later studied at Eton for four years. Orwell was an assistant superintendent with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. He left the position after five years and then moved to Paris, where he wrote his first two books, Burmese Days and Down and Out In Paris. Orwell then moved to Spain to write but decided to join the United Workers Marxist Party Militia. After being decidedly opposed to communism, Orwell served in the British Home Guard and with the Indian Service of the BBC during World War II. He started writing for the Observer and was literary editor for the Tribune. Soon after he published the world-famous book, Animal Farm, which became a huge success for Orwell. It was then towards the end of his life when Orwell wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four. George Orwell died on January 23, 1950 in London.

Irving Howe was born in the Bronx, New York on June 11, 1920. He became a socialist at the age of 14. He graduated from City College in 1940. During World War II, he served in the Army. After the war, he began writing book reviews and essays for several magazines including Commentary, The Nation, and Partisan Review. For four years, he earned a living writing book reviews for Time magazine. He taught English at several colleges including Brandeis University, Stanford University, Hunter College, and City University, which he retired from in 1986. In 1954, he and a group of close friends founded the radical journal Dissent. He was the editor for nearly four decades. Also in the 1950's, he met a Yiddish poet named Eliezer Greenberg and the two began a long project to translate Yiddish prose and poetry into English, eventually publishing six collections of stories, essays, and poems. He wrote several books including Decline of the New, Politics and the Novel, and an autobiography entitled A Margin of Hope. World of Our Fathers won the National Book Award in 1976. He wrote critical studies of William Faulkner and Sherwood Anderson and a biography of Leon Trotsky. He died of cardiovascular disease on May 5, 1993 at the age of 72.

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