Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-four: Text, Sources, Criticism

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Jan 1, 1982 - Dystopias in literature - 450 pages
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Review: Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four: Text, Sources, Criticism

User Review  - Brittany - Goodreads

This book was a very thought provoking story. Makes me wish that more people would read it and realize how a world like that could come into being. Read full review

Contents

PART ONE Text
1
Aldous Huxley from Brave New World
209
Eugene Zamiatin from We
224
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

George Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair in 1903 in Motihari in Bengal, India and later studied at Eton for four years. Orwell was an assistant superintendent with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. He left the position after five years and then moved to Paris, where he wrote his first two books, Burmese Days and Down and Out In Paris. Orwell then moved to Spain to write but decided to join the United Workers Marxist Party Militia. After being decidedly opposed to communism, Orwell served in the British Home Guard and with the Indian Service of the BBC during World War II. He started writing for the Observer and was literary editor for the Tribune. Soon after he published the world-famous book, Animal Farm, which became a huge success for Orwell. It was then towards the end of his life when Orwell wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four. George Orwell died on January 23, 1950 in London.

A self-styled "democratic socialist," founder and editor of the radical journal Dissent, and a regular contributor to The New Republic, Howe was professor of English at Hunter College. His first book, Sherwood Anderson (1951), made a substantial impression on his contemporaries and firmly established his reputation as a critic. He wrote several volumes of essays on literary topics---some of these with an emphasis on political commitments---all informed by a sensitive critical intellect. He felt that the fundamental problem with modern culture is that we look for meaning of life outside of it, rather than engaging with social and cultural issues as concerned citizens, active members of civil society. Howe insisted that moderation threatens our social order as much as radicalism because it is "passive, indifferent and atomized." His valuable introduction to The Idea of the Modern in Literature and the Arts (1971) reveals an uncomfortable awareness of the difficulties of modernism and a deep dissatisfaction with the limited role of the contemporary critic. By contrast, Howe wanted criticism to form our tastes, to come to the defense of literacy, and to confirm the ideal of individual imagination. Another of Howe's works, World of Our Fathers (1976), is a look at the lives of Jewish immigrants in New York during the early years of the century.

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